The hidden wolves

Wolves are wild. Wolves are sly. Wolves are elusive. Most wolves are never seen.

History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund is told from the perspective of an adult Linda, trying to make sense of the decisions she made in her youth. In the first chapter we learn that a four-year-old boy named Paul has died and his parents are on trial. It is clear that Linda has a connection to Paul. The remainder of the book flips from present to past giving us clues and details to how Paul came to be part of Linda’s life.

Her teenage years take place in rural Minnesota, miles away from civilization. The setting paints a picture of cold and solitude, much like Linda’s life. She lives in a neglected and derelict cabin, left over from the ruins of a now disbanded commune.  Ignored by her parents, Linda is left to raise herself.

At school she is called ‘commie’ or ‘freak.’ She sits on the outside of things, a permanent spectator, never quite fitting in.

Her isolation is lifted one spring when she meets young Paul and his mother Patra. Linda is offered the job of watching Paul during the day. Patra suggests she adopt the title of ‘governess’ instead of babysitter or nanny, symbolizing her new role within their family. Nurturing does not come easily to Linda. At times Paul irritates her and she struggles to bond with him. But her desire to belong is overwhelming. Paul and Patra offer her an intimacy that she has long desired.

Unfortunately, there are wolves hiding among this seemingly perfect life. Indeed, there are wolves hidden throughout entire the book.

History of Wolves leaves so much to be unraveled; it will be a popular choice for book clubs. Emily Fridlund is a master at creating both descriptive metaphors and themes that cycle through the story. Self awareness is at the core of the book, as is loneliness. It opens up many questions to be answered – who is the real wolf in the story?

History of Wolves was long listed for the 2017 Man Booker Prize and was a finalist for the Midwest Booksellers Choice Awards.

-Lesley L.

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