Time Flies

When I recently borrowed Cooking for Friends by David Wood, I received a shock. I remember the first David Wood cookbook I borrowed. Not his iconic Food Book but, unsurprisingly for those who know me or read my blog posts, The Dessert Book. I could even recall the cover, which featured an amazing-looking strawberry pie which I proceed to make and, yes, it tasted amazing too.

Seeing a new book by David Wood on the shelves, I just had to borrow it. The shock came when I realized it was 30 years (!!) since his Dessert Book was published which meant 30 years has passed since I made that bit of strawberry bliss! How is that possible when I’m barely over 30 myself? 😉 I even visited Wood’s gourmet food shop in Toronto once and treated myself to some decadent goodies.

Wood was born and raised in post-war Scotland where food was rationed and was viewed as something to fuel the body rather than rhapsodize over. As a young adult, Wood honed his cooking skills and his tastes became, like most people, more refined as he matured. Moving to Canada in 1973, he opened the first of three gourmet food shops 1984. A catering business and two cookbooks soon followed. In the 1990s, following some tough times including the closure of his shops, Wood left Toronto for the warmer climes of BC and in 1996 opened Salt Spring Island Cheese Company after “…six years of trial and error on the farm and in the kitchen.”

As Wood says in the Introduction to “Cooking for Friends” (which is worth reading, as is the forward), “…the best thing about food is that it brings us together with friends and family (who are also friends) – it eases conversations and opens our hearts and minds…” This cookbook is about creating delicious, satisfying and attractive food at home, without needing the skills of a professional chef.

I chose to make just one sweet (although the Pear and Ginger Galette will definitely be on the menu at my house at a future family get together), a starter and two mains. The dessert recipe I tried was Lemon Possets. The recipe contains just 3 ingredients but the result is a smooth, citrusy custard that is just divine. You can decorate the possets with a raspberry or two and some lemon zest or just eat as is. Wood’s Chicken Wonderful is, well, wonderful! He recommends serving it with salad and a baguette but we opted for a mixture of steamed broccoli and cauliflower. Easy and scrumptious. I could happily eat this once a week.

The Spicy Garlic Shrimp would be a wonderful starter but the night I made it we enjoyed the shrimp as a main, perched atop my own un-fried vegetable fried rice. My favourite of the four recipes tried though was the Tagliatelle with Salmon, Crème Fraiche and Chives. This dish looked and tasted amazing even though I substituted a mixture of sour cream and yogurt for the crème fraiche. Served with a glass of chilled Oyster Bay chardonnay from New Zealand it was a treat on a weeknight. Yes, easy enough to make at the end of the work day.

Cooking for Friends would be a wonderful addition to any collection. This Canadian cookbook features beautiful photos, an excellent selection of recipes and clear, concise directions. Two whisks up from me!

— Sandi H.

Tagliatelle with Salmon, Crème Fraiche and Chives

2 egg yolks
2 c. crème fraiche (or try a yogurt/sour cream substitute like I did!)
½ c grated Parmesan
¼ c chopped fresh chives
1 tsp grated lemon zest
1 tsp ground black pepper
2 tblsp chopping Italian parsley + some for garnish
12 oz boneless fresh salmon fillet
1 tsp salt
1 lb. fresh tagliatelle

In a small bowl beat together yolks, ½ c of the crème fraiche, Parmesan, chives, zest, pepper and parsley. Set aside.

In a pot big enough to hold the cooked, drained pasta, bring the remained 1 ½ c. crème fraiche to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer.

Carefully cut the salmon into 1/4” slices, then cut the slices across into strips, each about the size of 4 matchsticks tied together. Set aside.

Cook the pasta in salted boiling water. Drain when done, reserving 1 c of the cooking water.

Transfer the pasta to the large pot containing the warmed crème fraiche and stir to coat. Add in the egg yolk mixture and stir to combine. Use cooking liquid as need to prevent the pasta from drying out or the sauce from becoming too thick. Add salmon and stir very gently to avoid breaking up the fish. The heat from the pasta will cook the thin strips of salmon perfectly.

Note: I chose to bake the salmon whole and serve the tagliatelle on the side.

salmon_blog

Mrs. Everything

I think every woman will find a bit of herself in Jennifer Weiner’s latest book. With story lines that focus on the good, the not-so-good and the wonderful aspects of being a woman, Mrs. Everything contains voices of mothers, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, aunts and partners and weaves in issues that women can relate to in varying degrees.

This is a lengthy novel that spans decades and follows the lives of two sisters, Jo and Bethie. Through their stories, Weiner addresses many issues that women faced in the past, the issues we have in the present and as well as those that may continue to affect the future of women. She hits on emotional topics through the changing decades and blends them into a story that will captivate readers as we tag along on the bumpy journey of these two women as they figure out who they are on their own and together as sisters.

This is a hearty read at 464 pages and, I’ll admit, it felt like it dragged a bit at times. But it’s this length that allows Weiner to dig deeper into important issues and show how they reverberate through the sisters’ lives – issues that include women’s roles within family and society as well as our continued struggle for the right to choose what happens to our own bodies.

Through Jo and Bethie, Weiner discusses topics that were important to the women who came before us, to the women we are now and hopefully will embolden society to bring much needed change as we work to transform a world that lifts up and encourages the daughters we’re raising today.

This is a powerful story that will run readers through a spectrum of emotions. You’ll cry, laugh, feel frustrated and empowered as you read this story about two sisters and their journey to find fulfillment, love and acceptance as women in complicated and ever-changing times.

Note: I highly recommend that readers read Weiner’s forward which describes where her inspiration for this story began.

— Laurie P.

Escape at Dannemora

A Real Life Shawshank Redemption Miniseries

On the morning of June 6 2015, two prisoners were discovered missing from their cells at the Clinton Correctional Facility. Since its construction over 150 years ago, no one had ever escaped from this New York State maximum security prison. What followed was a 3-week manhunt that would be plastered across the media. Convicted murders David Sweat and Richard Matt tunneled out of their cells, crawled through a heating pipe and made their way out of a manhole to the streets in Dannemora. Once outside, they hid in the wilderness for weeks planning to cross the border into Canada.

escape-at-dannemora-dvdEscape at Dannemora is a dramatic television miniseries that retells how Sweat and Matt, along with the help of prison worker Joyce “Tilly” Mitchell, orchestrated a real life Shawshank Redemption prison break.

The first episode starts with Tilly being brought in wearing a black and white jump suit. Her involvement with Matt and Sweat is fully fleshed out throughout the series. Without her, their escape would not be possible. Six more episodes follow, focusing not only on the escape plot but on character motives as well. It is a far more complex story than just two men breaking through cell walls.

In the beginning of the series, the story humanizes Sweat and Matt. Although they are inmates, you can understand that their lives in prison are brutal. You can relate to their desperate need to get out. Then, after the pair escapes, the story very bluntly reminds you that they are in fact very dangerous people who have committed horrendous acts. They were in prison for a reason.

At the start, Tilly’s character was also somewhat sympathetic, only to show, little by little that in her own way she is as sinister as Sweat and Matt.

The biggest surprise for me was that it was directed by Ben Stiller. Looking at his previous movies, which are mostly over-the-top comedies like Zoolander and Tropic Thunder, I certainly wouldn’t have guessed he could create such an exceptional dramatic production. He has shown to have remarkable ability when it comes to storytelling and character development. The shots Stiller used to visibly demonstrate the escape plan were brilliant. Where was he hiding this talent for all these years?

This series puts Ben Stiller on par with the likes of directors Cary Joji Fukunaga (True Detective) and Joe Chapelle (The Wire). Escape at Dannemora has proven that Stiller has an incredibly versatile skill set. I can only hope he takes on more dramatic projects in the future.

— Lesley L.

The Path Made Clear

In all my years of reading, I’ve come to understand that I’m a mood reader. While many would argue that it’s important to be selective with what you read, I’d argue that when you read a particular book is just as important. How many books have you put aside because you weren’t in the mood for it? It’s difficult to predict when you are in the mood for a particular book, but when you select the right book at the right time, it’s a defining experience. Most times this moment is serendipitous, and you pick up the book you need most without even knowing it.

My most recent experience with this happened last week. My mom surprised me with a copy of The Path Made Clear by Oprah Winfrey. At first, I was confused. It was a new release I hadn’t heard of, and it wasn’t fiction (my go-to genre). All she said was, “I really think you need to read this.”

I’ll admit, I was skeptical at first. I’ve never read a self-help book before. I didn’t know how a stranger giving life advice would have any resounding impact on me. While advice from a trusted friend or family member is usually helpful (or at least intended to be helpful), could this book really help me find my purpose even if it is Oprah of all people leading the way? It’s just like when your parent tries to tell you not to do something, but you do it anyway. I assumed that applied to self-help books.

I set aside my uncertainties, and I discovered that The Path Made Clear is a guide that offers the framework to help you discover your life’s direction and purpose. No matter what life stage you find yourself in, this book can certainly help you evaluate, or re-evaluate, your life’s significance. Are you looking to find your purpose? Are you struggling to find meaning? What fulfills you? Who do you want to be? How do you want to make your mark in this world? This book provides the tools and wisdom to begin a discussion with yourself.

The book is divided into ten chapters that include reflections, interviews, and anecdotes from notable professionals in a variety of fields from the likes of Trevor Noah to Deepak Chopra. Each chapter begins with an introduction from Oprah herself who sets the theme of the chapter while encouraging you to reflect on who you are, what is meaningful to you, and how can you work towards actualizing that meaning.

This book comes at a time where I am in the midst of questioning my own life purpose, and how I wanted to contribute to our world in a meaningful way. While you shouldn’t expect to find fully formed answers in this book, I did find insights that made me pause and reflect. In a world full of expectation and noise, it can be especially difficult to listen to your inner voice when everything tries to drown it out. I started listening, wondering, and envisioning through each chapter.

If you’re looking for an uplifting and thoughtful discourse regarding meaning and purpose, then I think you should definitely borrow The Path Made Clear by Oprah Winfrey. If you’re also a fan of Oprah and her work on screen and on the page, you’ll also appreciate her latest book.

Maybe it’s Oprah, but this book was able to uplift me in a time when I felt stuck in the ground. But we don’t have to be stuck. As Oprah writes, “life is about growth and change, and when you are no longer doing either, you’ve received your first whisper” (45).

My Mom may have been right on this one (but don’t tell her).

— Eleni Z.

My Summer Reading Preview

A few months ago I read a magazine article featuring Crazy Rich Asian-worthy leather bags with the hottest spring novels poking out of them.  I’m pretty sure they were capitalizing on the idea that in the last year or so every celebrity has started a book club and many are choosing to be photographed with book in hand.  It looks like books are a go-to accessory.  Well, we always knew that in the library!

Of course a sturdy, stylish bag is required to carry these important items.  I approved of their thinking until I checked out the prices on the suggested handbags! One carried the caption “price available upon request” which is never a good sign if you are budget-minded.  Now if you are the Duchess of Sussex then any bag is a possible purchase.  Her bags will need to be roomy and practical for a while and the books she is more likely to carry will be board books.  Or maybe she could look into reading Weird Parenting Wins?  Perhaps she will be able to enjoy a novel once in a while if Harry shares the parenting.  I do hope so.

If you are looking for some fabulous summer reads to carry around in your beach tote, here you go (they are also gorgeous so you will look extra snazzy just in case you happen to be caught by Waterloo paparazzi):

81Z2hxtqlYLRoselle Lim’s debut novel is going to check several boxes for delightful summer reading because she is from Scarborough (let’s celebrate reading a Canadian author), and the book takes place in Montreal AND in San Francisco so it feels like taking a book vacation.  Also, her main character struggles with some mother-daughter-grandmother guilt and then falls in love giving us a prize at the end of all of that painful family reflection. In Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune, Natalie has to return to the apartment she shared with her mother to tidy up, plan her mother’s funeral and decide what she will do with her legacy – the family restaurant.  There is a love story in this book, the grief of losing her mother, and the excitement of lots of cooking (the author includes recipes) all set in a cozy San Francisco neighbourhood.  I can’t think of anything more delicious – just look at that cover.

811i2lI31-LThe last book that Blake Crouch wrote was so much fun to read that I am planning to pop some popcorn before I sit down with this one.  Reading Dark Matter felt like watching a film with a full on thriller plot plus a touch of romance for balance and it looks like Recursion shares some of that same mix.  Crouch has a neuroscientist researching false memory syndrome as a way to help Alzheimer patients but the wealthy tech guru who is funding her project might not have the best motives.  Fantastic! In combination with this plot we have a NY detective investigating crimes that are linked to false memory syndrome and the thrills just keep piling on.  It might be worth popping two bags of popcorn (or use any manner of snack preparation you feel is appropriate in your home) because with a story like this you will not want to leave the couch for a moment.

the-stationery-shop-9781982129866_hrRoya and Bahman meet at the stationery shop in 1953 Tehran and slowly fall in love after an introduction by the owner, Mr. Fakhri.  They start meeting weekly and agree to marry despite the protests of Bahman’s mother.  One night he doesn’t appear at their agreed time and after several attempts to contact him Roya must eventually give up and move on with her life.  Sixty years later they meet in Boston and she is able to find answers to the questions she has carried with her for decades.  It’s a vibrant, lush story by Marjan Kamali of a young woman’s life and how she tries to move on from heartbreak.  You can’t help but wonder what their first conversation will be like after those years apart.

91Q73aHp3PLAnd in the category of books I would have wished to be written if I knew that I should have been wishing for them is Evvie Drake Starts Over.  This novel about an unlikely friendship between a grieving widow and a former Major League pitcher who has lost the ability to throw a baseball is going to be the highlight of my summer (even though I didn’t know that I could have been wishing for it).  Baseball novels and summer go together like peanuts and Cracker Jack and their unlikely friendship turns into a romance.  How do these people become friends and possibly more?  They are introduced to each other by a mutual friend because Dean (the pitcher) needs somewhere to hide away from the New York media and a small town in Maine seems like the place.  The best part of this remarkable summer read is that this is the first novel from NPR Host Linda Holmes so we know it is going to be warm, quirky and filled with authentic baseball references as she is known to frequent sports podcasts as a guest.  Batter up!  Evvie and I are going to be such good friends – I just know it.

downloadWho wouldn’t want to read a thriller about a book club where too many bottles of wine are enjoyed and a game of never-have-I-ever goes too far?  In the hands of Joshilyn Jackson I know that I am going to be invested in her characters but also a little bit tense because I will constantly worrying about them.  This is the perfect book recipe for a summer afternoon read on a porch, dock or extra-long soccer practice.  According to early reviews the main character, Amy Whey, is the perfect hostess, the kind of person who bakes cookies for new neighbours, and gets along with everyone (she is also a part-time diving instructor which is surely going create scenes which terrify me at some point) but finds herself on edge when a new book club member obviously knows too much about her secrets.  Yes!  How will it end?  I couldn’t possibly guess but the publisher used the words “betrayal, deception & temptation” so you know it’s going to be great.  I just hope it doesn’t cause me to worry when new people join our book club.  Maybe I’ll just discourage everyone from playing ‘never have I ever’ after we talk about the book.

You might not be thinking like Emma or SJP and carrying books around strategically or basing your next project on a novel like Reese does but you still need something wonderful to fill your book bag.  We have shelves filled with the latest choices for summer reading and would also be happy to help you out with a bargain of a stylish bag.  For just $3.00 you can carry one that proudly says “Waterloo Public Library” and holds at least eight hardcovers and twice as many paperbacks.  Come on summer – we are ready for you.

— Penny M.

One eRead Canada

Read Glass Beads with Canada-Wide eBook Club

one eread canada logo blueThis Indigenous History Month, from June 3 to 30th, readers all across Canada are invited to read Glass Beads by Dawn Dumont as part of the “One eRead Canada” campaign. Along with other participating libraries across Canada, WPL will make the eBook and eAudiobook editions of Glass Beads available with no holds or wait lists all month long.

About the Book

Glass Beads is by Saskatchewan-born Plains Cree author, actor, and comedian Dawn Dumont. It’s an engaging collection of interconnected short stories about four First Nations people, set against a backdrop of two decades of political, social, and cultural change.

How to Participate in One eRead Canada

Your Waterloo Public Library membership will give you free access Glass Beads in eBook and eAudiobook format through Download Library in our Digital Library. You can also borrow the book.

Join in the discussion with other readers across the country:

  • on social media using the hashtag #1eReadLivrelCanada
  • in a special Facebook Group, hosted by Vancouver Public Library and open to all
  • at a Facebook Live event with Dawn Dumont, on June 12th at [6pm in Saskatoon, 8pm EST, 5pm PST]. You can submit questions for Dawn using the hashtag #Question

Dawn’s Picks

The author of ​Glass Beads, Dawn Dumont, has provided a booklist of her reading recommendations

Marilyn Dumont – ​A Really Good Brown Girl

Chelsea Vowel – ​Indigenous Writes

Alicia Elliot – ​A Mind Spread Out on the Ground

Cheri Dimaline – ​The Marrow Thieves

Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm – ​My Heart is a Stray Bullet

About One eRead Canada

One eRead Canada is organized by the Canadian Urban Libraries Council/Conseil des Bibliothèques Urbaines du Canada (CULC/CBUC) – the people behind the eContent for Libraries campaign. Libraries are facing very high costs for ebooks and eaudiobooks – and some titles aren’t available to libraries at all. With this campaign, CULC wants to show that libraries introduce readers to new books, which actually helps to drive sales to publishers.

About Thistledown Press

Glass Beads’ publisher, Thistledown Press, is an independent Canadian publisher that is taking an active role in making eContent more accessible to the public, in partnership with public libraries.

Reviews

“Comparable to the complexity of Richard Van Camp’s work, ​Glass Beads
​ is a compelling representation of urban Indigenous life.” — Jade Colbert, ​The Globe and Mail

“Glass Beads​ is deeply political but never ideological. Its characters are full and complex. …[T]his book tells the stories of people vastly underrepresented in CanLit.” — J.C. Sutcliffe, ​Quill & Quire