Back to Basics

Not to be conceited but my baking skills are beyond basic. That being said, I am far (far) from being a professional baker and am always ready to learn something new and try something new. When I saw Rose’s Baking Basics on the new book display with a beautiful meringue-topped pie on the cover, I tucked it away in my book bag along with 3 other new cookbooks.

Rose Levy Beranbaum, author of 12 cookbooks, blogger, award-winning food writer and baker, is also known as the “Diva of Desserts”. She is a 3-time winner of a James Beard Award, had her own TV series on PBS and has a line of cookware. This is all super impressive but as many readers know, just because an author/book wins an award doesn’t mean the book will be a winner with us!

At first her name wasn’t familiar to me but as I did a little research for this review I recognized the covers for “Rose’s Christmas Cookies” (c1990) and “Rose’s Pie & Pastry Bible” (c1998). So I actually revisiting recipes by Rose Levy Beranbaum and it was a triumphant return.

With all the sweets popping up lately, first over Christmas and New Year’s and now with Valentine’s Day on the horizon,  I was ready to make something less sugary. The first recipe I tried from Rose’s Baking Basics was the Butter Biscuits. I’ve made biscuits before of course and they were okay-to-good but nothing to write home about, if I’m honest. This changed on the weekend when I tried Rose’s recipe.

In “Baking Basics” there are detailed, step-by-step instructions along with lots of photos of the process as well as the finished product. As I looked at the list of ingredients for the biscuits I was puzzled by the first on the list: 3 large eggs, hard cooked, yolks only. Hardboiled egg yolks? In biscuits? I read the recipe again. These are biscuits, right? Yes. Then I took the time to read the intro to the recipe:

“These biscuits are exceptionally soft, tender and velvety. The secret ingredient is from James Beard, with whom I studied fifty years ago: hard cooked egg yolk.”

rose_biscuits_003Who am I to argue with James Beard and Rose Levy Beranbaum? I followed the recipe, cutting the amounts by 50% to make just a half batch. The dough came together with hardly any kneading at all. I cut out my biscuits and popped them in the oven. Fifteen minutes later I had fresh, warm biscuits that looked exactly like the photo in the book. My husband could hardly wait for them to cool. They were fantastic! The first one I tried with some butter but really they are absolutely delicious on their own. This is a recipe to keep forever.

I also made the Peanut Butter & Jelly Thumprint cookies. They were easy to make and pretty tasty. I must say though that I have used the same peanut butter cookie recipe for my entire life and although Beranbaum’s recipe is a good one, I think next time I’ll use my cookie recipe but steal her idea re: the jammy thumbprint.

This gorgeous cookbook is a wonderful addition to the WPL collection and would also be a great addition to a personal collection, whether you’re a newbie to baking or a seasoned baker.

— Sandi H.

Butter Biscuits

3 large eggs, hard cooked, yolks only
1 ½ c. all purpose flour
¾ c cake & pastry self raising flour
3 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
¼ c white sugar
6 tablespoons butter, room temperature
3/4 c heavy (whipping) cream

Preheat oven to 375F. Lightly grease baking sheets.

Press egg yolks through mesh strainer (I used a tea strainer) into small bowl. Set aside.

In large bowl, combine flours, powder, salt and sugar. With a pastry blender, work in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in cream until the flour is moistened and coming together in a ball.

Empty dough onto a lightly floured counter or baking board. Knead a couple of times until it feels smooth and not sticky.

Pat until 3/4” thickness. Using cutters (I just use a glass tumbler), cut into medium-sized circles. Place on baking sheet and put in oven.

Increase heat to 400F. Bake for 5 minutes then lower the temperature back to 375F. Bake for 10 more minutes or until golden.

Remove from oven. Transfer to cooling rack. Serve plain, or with butter or jam. They are best served warm from the oven or eaten within a day or so of baking.

NOTE: this is a condensed version of the instructions. If you would like more details and information on freezing the biscuits, or info on baking with soft sides vs crisp sides, borrow Rose’s Baking Basics from the library.

Waffles, Knope & Galentine’s Day

February needs all the help it can get. It’s the shortest month in the calendar but just seems so long. Breaking it up midway with a cheerful holiday on the 14th really helps give February a much needed boost. Here at the library we celebrate Library Lovers month in February so it’s a special month for us and in recent years I have also been participating in the wonderful celebration of Galentine’s Day, on February 13th, with the encouragement of friends. I’ve found that this makes all the difference in getting me through the second month of the year.

If you aren’t yet participating in this worldwide celebration sensation you can get started by watching Parks and Recreation, Season Two (Episode Sixteen) where the always enthusiastic Leslie Knope first brings all of her very best female friends together for a brunch which she describes as being “…like Lilith Fair, minus the angst. Plus frittatas!”

Knope honours her friends with appropriate gifts (Leslie is the best at gift giving) and the personalized gift bags include fabulous items including gorgeous mosaics she has made of their faces. In seasons four and six of the show the writers return to Galentine’s Day and the theme of enjoying breakfast foods continues as does the emphasis on the strength of friendship. These are traditions worth adopting and you can find inspiration across the Internet as the special season arrives.

Turn to Etsy for gifts and cards made by talented artists. Or look to our collection of books that can help you to craft something special for your friends. I think a sweet little origami box made in your BFF’s favourite colour that you fill with delicious treats could be just the thing to drop into her book bag on February 13th. Or, if you really want to do this Knope-style you can make that mosaic of her face but you’d better get started now. That kind of gifting magic takes a long time to pull together.

Cover.final_.wAnother great way to celebrate Galentine’s Day is with a wonderful meal. We have so many great spots in town that you can hit for a delicious meal but how about you invite some friends over to your house for some treats and a good long chat about your friendship. There really is nothing better. When you eat at home there is no chance of feeling like you need to give up your table because the restaurant is getting busy – it’s your table. Just brew some more coffee or boil additional water for tea and make the fun last longer. It’s the best feeling. You can choose to go with a Parks and Rec classic and make the very best waffles or splash out make frittatas. You can’t help but be inspired by this 2017 cookbook from Rebecca Wellman, called First, we brunch: recipes and stories from Victoria’s best breakfast joints – your breakfast and brunch will really never be the same.

Should you feel like you want to keep your Parks and Rec vibe going after February 13th I heartily recommend the books of actors Amy Poehler and Retta (both women narrate their own audiobooks so you could listen to their wonderful voices tell you the secrets behind filming the television show where they first met – it is so much fun).

And finally. A personal tip. If you cut up your waffles in advance and make a small pool of whipped cream on your plate, you can dip each bite one-handed while you hold your book in the other hand and make it seem like you are celebrating a one person Galentine’s Day at any time of the year. We are all, as Lesley Knope says, “…beautiful rule-breaking moths.”

— Penny M.

Hay! It’s Worth a Look.

I’ve never borrowed a cookbook by Australian food stylist Donna Hay before. I’ve admired them in book stores and at the library of course but for some reason never picked one up. That is until I spied the latest one, Modern Baking : cakes, cookies and everything in between, on the new book display at the Main Library.

Hay became a food stylist when she was still in her teens. A handful of years later and she was appointed the food editor of marie claire magazine. She launched her own magazine in 2001, a housewares line in 2009 and a TV series in 2011. Besides these accomplishments, she has written 26 cookbooks with over 6 million copies sold. WPL has just two at the moment, Modern Baking and Basics to Brilliance Kids : a healthy book for big and little cooks.

Modern Baking is a hefty 400 page tome. It contains over 250 recipes with chapters divided by ingredient e.g. chocolate, fruit & berries, milk & cream etc. Many pages had very dark backgrounds and the text in white which was a little difficult to read. I persevered as the recipes sounded wonderful and the photos were just beautiful.

I saw many (many!) recipes I’d love to try but the Ginger Molasses Cookies from the “Sugar & Spice” section won out. Now. Confession time. I did take a few liberties with Hay’s recipe. I’m not a fan of peel or crystalized ginger so chose to omit that. I also used pureed ginger (store bought; not done by my own fair hand) instead of grated fresh.

untitled-2As I read through the directions, they seemed unduly complicated for cookies so went with my seasoned baker’s instincts and used a more basic methodology which is included below. If you prefer lengthy instructions just borrow Modern Baking from the library and you’ll get details and then some.

The Ginger Molasses Cookies were absolutely scrumptious! Buttery, with a nice crunch and lovely ginger flavour. Not overpowering at all. Two thumbs up from my household! And actually, they tasted even nicer the next day.

So, will Donna Hay’s “Modern Baking” make it into my own personal collection of cookbooks? Perhaps. I will definitely borrow it again from the library and a try out a few more recipes (the peanut butter fudge sounded awesome)  but on the strength of the Ginger Molasses Cookies, I’d say the odds are good.

  • Sandi H.

Ginger Molasses Cookies

1 c butter, softened
1 c light brown sugar
¾ c white (granulated) sugar
1 egg
1 egg yolk
2 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp finely grated fresh ginger
2 tblsp molasses
¼ tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
1 tsp water
2 c all-purpose flour
¼ tsp salt
2 tsp ground ginger
½ c crystallised ginger, chopped (optional)
½ c Demerara sugar

In large bowl beat butter and sugar with electric mixer on medium until well blended. Beat in egg, yolk and vanilla. Beat for 2 minutes or until creamy.

In little dish stir together powder, soda and water. Add to batter along with the fresh ginger and molasses. Stir to combine. Add in flour, salt and ground ginger. Blend in gently.

Cover mixing bowl and chill the dough for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 325F. Lightly grease cookie sheets and set aside.

Roll dough into 1” balls, roll in Demerara and bake for 15 minutes. Leave room on cookie sheets as they will flatten and spread. Let cool slightly on baking sheets before transferring to cooling racks to cool completely. Enjoy!

NOTE: it says that this recipe makes 15 cookies but I ended up with almost double that amount in what I’d say were medium-sized biscuits.

Mary Berry Everyday

Mary Berry. What can you say about Mary Berry? Although a food writer and TV presenter since the 1960s, many people (here, at least) have only come to know her more recently as co-judge with Paul Hollywood on the runaway British hit, “The Great British Bake”. Each week on the show (known as The Great British Baking Show in North America) home bakers are pitted against one another, taking on a variety of challenges in order to win the grand prize: a much-coveted crystal cake plate.

I love food shows and this is one of my favourites. My husband, who is not a baker, watches as well…and enjoys the home baked treats somewhat inspired from my watching.

Mary’s bare bone bio is:

  • she trained at The Cordon Bleu in Paris and ran a cookery school at her home
  • in the 1960s she was the cookery editor two major magazines in the UK
  • her first television series came in the 1970s
  • since 1970, she has written 75 cookbooks…and counting

I recently borrowed her new book, “Mary Berry Everyday”, which accompanies the television program of the same name. Having a flick through, there were many recipes that I was tempted to try but in the end I went with the biscuits featured on the cover. And they ARE cover worthy! Melt-in-the-mouth, buttery and with a lovely citrus flavour thanks to fresh orange peel and juice in the glaze. Oh, and easy to bake too.
Two floury thumbs up from me. Borrow “Everyday” and get baking!

— Sandi H.

Mary Berry’s Orange Oat Cookies

Dough

1 c butter, softened
1 c white sugar
Finely grated zest of 2 oranges
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 ¾ c self-raising flour
¼ c oatmeal

Glaze/Icing

1 c icing sugar
¼ tsp orange oil (optional)
2 tblsp freshly squeeze orange juice

Preheat oven to 350F.

Cream together butter and sugar. Mix in egg, oil and 2/3 of the zest. Stir in flour and oatmeal.

Lightly dust a work surface with small amount of flour. Roll the dough into balls about the size of a walnut. The flour will make this easy; stopping them from being too sticky.

Set on prepared cookie sheets, about 8 per sheet as they do spread. Flatten each ball with the bottom of a glass until ½” thick.

Bake for 13 minutes or until just golden at the edges. Watch closely as they burn easily!

Cool on the cookie sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to cooling rack to cool completely.

To make the glaze, whisk together the icing sugar with approximately 2 tblsp juice.

When the cookies are completely cool, spread glaze on top of cookies or drizzle with the glaze. Sprinkle with rest of the orange zest.

Makes 2 dozen.

Lookin’ Not Cookin’

There are thousands…hundreds of thousands…millions probably…of cookbooks out there. And while we don’t have millions of cookbooks at WPL, our collection is impressive and highly popular. Just take a walk down the cookbook aisle at the Main Library (Harper and McCormick have excellent selections too) and you will see just how wide-ranging they are.

Need to learn how to boil water? We have a good selection of very basic cookery books for adults…and for kids too. Have you jumped on the Instant Pot bandwagon? WPL has cookbooks to make the most of the newest small appliance in your home. Does your New Year’s resolution include the Keto diet? We have Keto cookbooks. Making your own pad thai? We have just the cookbook for you.

Like most book selections, picking the right cookbook is a personal affair. A book that catches the eye of one person will be passed over by another. Confession. I will not borrow a cookbook that doesn’t have photos. This being said, beautiful photos does not a great cookbook make.

Recently I borrowed 3 gorgeous new cookbooks. However, when I had time to sit down and actually go through them, I wasn’t particularly inspired by any. In my mind they were cookbooks for lookin’ and not for cookin’.

Coco Cake Land : cute and pretty party cakes to bake and decorate” by Lyndsay Sung has an adorable cake on the cover and many inbetween. Sung is a “…baker, blogger and mama from Vancouver, BC.” and is self-taught. While I admired the cakes, my own cake & cookie decorating skills are rather more basic and my aspirations minimal. Although I wasn’t tempted to try Sung’s recipes I did thoroughly enjoy browsing through her book.

The Little Library Cookbook” was an obvious choice for me to take home. The book, by award-winning food writer, Kate Young, is about the pairing of food with literature. This was Young’s first book and it won a World Gourmand food writing award. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book quotes, notes from the author, and seeing what food items she had selected from which book. Again, I wasn’t compelled to try the recipes. It’s a beautifully put together book and worth a look. If you borrow it and make something, I’d love to hear about it.

IMG_20181216_1514001Finally, “Baking All Year Round” by Rosanna Pansino. I bake all year round so thought this should be right up my alley. Pansino is a YouTube star whose baking videos have been viewed over 3 billion (yes, billion with a “B”). In 2017 she was named Forbes’ Food Influencer of the Year. With 4 million followers on Instagram and almost 1 million on Twitter, how did I not know about her?

Back to the book though. Baking All Year Round is organized by celebratory occasion and Pansino has some super-cute decorating ideas especially for Halloween. However, be prepared to buy or rent cake moulds, work with a lot of fondant and set aside a chunk of time in which to assemble these goodies, which are guaranteed to greatly impress your family and friends.

Not a “fondant person”, I chose two of her simpler recipes to try. From the Father’s Day chapter, Salted Whisky Caramels and, from Christmas, Snowball Cookies. Both were pretty easy to make. A candy thermometer is a must for the caramels and the cookies should sit longer before dipping them in their snowy coating (icing sugar). I’d give the caramels a 6/10. The texture is good, they are buttery and chewy but the flavour of the whisky does not come through. The Snowball Cookies, a pecan shortbread, are delicious. I used ground pecans and the cookies just melt in your mouth. Something I would definitely make again.

So while none of these books will make it into my personal collection, they are worth a flick through. As are hundreds of others. Now, how to find that spare time…

– Sandi H.

Snowball Cookies

½ c butter, softened
¼ c granulated white sugar
¼ c icing sugar
½ tsp vanilla
1 ½ c. all purpose flour
1 c finely chopped toasted pecans
Pinch salt
Icing sugar to roll cookies in

Preheat oven to 350F.

Grease baking sheets or line with parchment paper. Set aside.

In large bowl with electric mixer beat the butter, white sugar ad ¼ c icing sugar until fluffy. Beat in vanilla. On low speed, blend in flour, salt and nuts until combined.
Roll dough into small balls (walnut-sized). Space 1” apart on baking sheets. Bake 12 minutes or until the bottoms of the cookies start to brown.

Cool on baking sheets 5 minutes.

When cookies are still warm, roll in icing sugar to coat. Set cookies on cooling rack and let cool for another 10 minutes, then roll again.

It Really is Delish!

delish-ht-ml-181017_hpEmbed_8x9_608It’s no secret. I love baking. I love cooking. I love trying new recipes. I enjoy TV shows revolving around food but rarely have time to sit down and watch them. And although I follow some favourite restaurants, chefs and food writers on social media, I am still more old school. Yes, you’ll find me browsing the cookbook section of the library or my favourite bookstores. So, when I took home the new cookbook “Delish”, I wasn’t aware of their “buzzy” background. In case you aren’t either, here’s the barebones version of their story.

Delish is a super popular food website with a very powerful presence on social media:

  • 19 million likes AND 19 million follows on Facebook
  • 1 million + followers on Instagram
  • Over 200,000 subscribers to their YouTube channel
  • 50,000 followers on Twitter

Relaunched in 2015, Delish is all about food and fun. According to their website, they wanted to “…create a place that was as much about delicious, easy recipes as it was about food as a fun lifestyle and cultural phenomenon.” Their youthful, energized team produce almost 200 new recipes a month, which is impressive to say the least. They also share crazy food stories, videos about their fav brands, info on celebrities and their eating habits and a whole lot more via their website and various social media platforms.
I don’t have time to look at their 18,000 + images on Facebook or thousands on Insta but what I did see looked yummmmmmy (that should probably be in caps!).

crack-chickenSo, although I’m not into the super-hype surrounding Delish (and the vibe made me feel a bit old, lol) I checked it out and set about testing a few recipes. The first was Crack Chicken which is basically boneless BBQ chicken wings. They are baked, not fried, and the panko crumb crust gives them good texture. The sauce, scrumptious, although it could be made with less sugar. They were easy to make and just delicious; a 10/10 from my husband, who was very sad there weren’t more stashed away! I also tried the Creamy Chicken Broccoli Bake which was, once again, easy and tasty and comforting on a cold winter evening. For a sweet, I made the Snickerdoodle Blondies. They were moist and rich. The next time I’d only make ½ of the cinnamon sugar that they recommend for sprinkling though.

Three recipes. Three successes. I didn’t have to buy any special ingredients for any of the recipes. There are quite a few other recipes throughout the book that I want to try. Mermaid Lemonade and Prosecco Grapes are on that list, as are Chicken Enchilada Skillets and Avocado Pesto Linguine. For these reasons I am hoping “Delish” shows up under the tree on December 25th for me.

— Sandi H.

Snickerdoodle Blondies

3/4 c. butter, softened
1 c. sugar
1/2 c. packed brown sugar
2 large eggs
2 tsp. vanilla
2 c. all-purpose flour
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
3/4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. cinnamon sugar (note from SH: using half this amount is plenty)

Preheat oven to 350° and grease a 9×9-inch pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl using a hand mixer, beat butter and both sugars until light and fluffy.

Add eggs and vanilla and beat until combined.

In another bowl, whisk together flour, cinnamon, baking powder, and salt. Add dry ingredients to wet ingredients and beat until just combined.

Press batter into prepared pan and sprinkle top with cinnamon sugar. Bake until golden and still slightly soft in the middle, 25 to 30 minutes.

Let cool completely before slicing into squares.

Headin’ South

My Mum is a big fan of HGTV. Not that she is taking on any home renovations but she loves to see what other people are doing with theirs! As for me, I’m more apt to be watching something on BBC-Canada or a DVD borrowed from the library, so when I stopped by one day and Mum was watching a program starring Joanna Gaines, the name was new to me. Checking Instagram later, I discovered that I’m obviously in the minority as Gaines has 9.2 million followers!

In one of those funny happenstances, not long after this I was given a copy of Magnolia Table : a collection of recipes for gathering by Joanna Gaines with Marah Stets. I’d never heard of Joanna Gaines and now here she was, popping up in my life twice.

Gaines, who describes herself as “Wife. Mom. Renovator. Designer. Shop owner. Homebody.” has a number of businesses in Waco, Texas along with husband Chip. They opened their first “Magnolia Market” in 2003 but closed it later as they focused their energy on raising 5 children and expanding their construction company. In 2014, she turned her attention back to Magnolia.

The book looked just beautiful. There was a mixture of images taken around the Gaines’ farmstead and photos of delicious, traditional meals. Apparently this cookbook sold almost 170,000 copies the first week it hit bookstore shelves.

IMG_20181125_1548242I first tried the Chocolate Dipped Shortbread Cookies. They were easy to make and pretty tasty although I have better shortbread recipes, I must say. I forwent dipping them in chocolate and instead used a little leftover icing from another bake and a bit of jam to create little sandwich cookies. My husband liked them…but didn’t love them.

I decided to try a second recipe. I had chicken thawing for dinner and thought I’d use Magnolia Table to create something different. I have to say, many of the chicken recipes were either fried or seemed to require cream cheese, heavy cream or Velveeta cheese. Now, I’m not the most virtuous eater but these rich dishes weren’t what I was looking for. The Almond Chicken Tenders sounded good and I had all of the ingredients in my pantry already.

I simplified the instructions, lightened up the amount of butter and oil, and ended up with a very tasty dish. The coating was light, the flavour from the almond flour was wonderful and the lemon juice added a brightness to the chicken.

While it is an attractive cookbook, I can’t say it’s personally a keeper for my own collection. Besides real BBQ (which I leave to the masters like the folks at Lancaster Smokehouse) I’m not a big fan of southern cooking. I am sharing Gaines’ recipe for the Almond Chicken Tenderloins below but with my own twists. However, if you want to go full-on Southern with this recipe, borrow the book from WPL (there’s just a short waiting list), buy it from your favourite bookseller or you could WIN my copy.

— Sandi H.

WIN “Magnolia Table”

2018-THE-MAGNOLIA-TABLE-COOKBOOK-1_1024x1024To have a chance at winning my copy of “Magnolia Table”:

Follow WPL on Instagram @waterloolibrary

Like the post about “Magnolia Table” with the comment “I love my library.”

The random draw will take place on Thursday, December 6, 2018.

The winner will need to pick their prize at WPL. Good luck!

Almond Chicken Tenders

½ c almond flour
½ c all purpose flour
1 tsp granulated garlic
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp oregano
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp salt
1 ½ lb chicken tenders, thawed
2 tbsp salted butter
4 tbsp olive oil
½ c sliced almonds (optional)
Juice of 1 lemon
Dried parsley (optional)

Combine dry ingredients and put in large ziplock bag. Add tenders to dry mixture. Seal bag and shake until coated.

In no-stick pan (I used a deep, electric skillet and set it at 325F), melt butter and add oil.

Add chicken (throw away leftover coating) and cook until done. Remove to serving platter.

Add lemon juice and almonds to pan. Cook, stirring continually with spatula, scraping everything together, for 1 minute. Pour over the chicken, sprinkle with parsley and serve.

Outrageous!

I have a few confessions to make. I love cooking. I love baking. I love discovering new recipes. I love cookbooks. Perhaps the most surprising confession? I rarely will buy a cookbook.

I borrow many (many) cookbooks from the library, finding a recipe here, a recipe there. However, very few cookbooks engage me enough to want to own the book forever and try the majority of recipes between its covers.

Family, friends and colleagues regularly share recipes with me, which I love. Sometimes I use good old Google to locate a recipe, especially if I’m trying to finish up something or other that is lingering in my pantry. There is an exception to my cookbook buying “rule”, well, a couple really. One exception is the cookbooks of Ina “The Barefoot Contessa” Garten.

Ina’s recipes are absolutely wonderful. They aren’t overly complicated, are flavourful and always work. Plus, they look awesome. Her roast chicken recipe is absolutely delicious, tender and juice and it looks exactly like the photo in the book. I shared the recipe with my nephew when he was hosting his first dinner party and his friends spent 10 minutes taking photos of the chicken to share online before diving in. Not a bite was left. That’s how good it is. Her chicken salad recipe. The best! Beef Bourguignon …amazing. I could go on and on.

choc_blogThe latest Barefoot Contessa book, “Cook Like a Pro”, was published this year. I believe it’s her 11th! As I wait patiently on the holds list, I decided to go back to Ina’s first cookbook and bake a batch of her incredible, super-chocolatey brownies for a recent family gathering. It has become my “go to” brownie recipe. Always work. Always decadent. Always disappear quickly.

— Sandi H.

Outrageous Brownies

1 cup butter
1 ¾ cup semisweet chocolate chips
2 – 1 oz squares bitter chocolate
3 extra-large eggs
2 tablespoons instant coffee granules
1 tablespoon vanilla
1 cup white sugar
3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Prepare a 9” x 9” baking pan.

Combine the butter and chocolate in a double-boiler. When the chocolate has melted, set aside to cool slightly.

In a large bowl, stir (do not beat) together the eggs, coffee granules, vanilla, and sugar. Stir the warm chocolate mixture into the egg mixture.

Combine flour, powder and salt. Add to chocolate mixture and stir just until combined.
Bake for 20 minutes. Do toothpick test. It is VERY easy to overbake. These should be moist.

Allow to cool thoroughly before cutting into bars.

Note: the original recipe is for a much larger quantity. Although my husband would love that, I usually make 1/2 and that is the recipe that I am sharing above

Bake It Better

The Great British Bake Off has spawned a LOT of cookbooks, from judges (Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood), from winners, and others. GBBO’s Bake It Better : Puddings and Desserts is written by food stylist Jayne Cross.

The Bake It Better series, which came out in 2016, is a new addition to WPL’s collection. The “Puddings and Desserts” volume (#5) with a beautiful trifle gracing the cover caught my eye and, yes, traveled home with me from the library that night.

It guarantees the recipes are tried and true. There are more basic recipes for newbees as well as “show stoppers” for those more seasoned bakers or for those looking for a challenge. I have to say I thought that, although not overly impressive on first glance, the book was interesting and I confess I did find it difficult to decide on which recipe to try so I left it in the hands of my chief tester: my husband.

He took a quick look through, lingered over a couple of recipes (one of which sounded particularly good but I didn’t have the ingredients for…it happens) before choosing the Coconut Lime Rice Pudding.

The pudding was very easy to make and the flavour was good. I chose to add some raisins (what is rice pudding without raisins??) as well as a bit of dried coconut which I think complimented the lime perfectly. I also like a less creamy pudding, so chose to add a bit more rice. The recipe made quite a lot of pudding so we’ve ended up reheating and it was scrumptious. The lime came through even a bit stronger second time round.

In my opinion, this cookbook is definitely worth borrowing but perhaps not worth buying, but you borrow it from the library and be the judge.

— Sandi H.

Coconut Lime Rice Pudding

For the Pudding
2 tblsp butter
½ c rice
¼ c white sugar
1 – 400 ml can coconut milk
400 ml homogenized milk
Grated zest of 2 limes
For the Sauce*
¾ c fresh or frozen raspberries
¼ c white sugar
Juice of 1 lime

Preheat oven to 275F.

To make the pudding, put the butter in a heat/oven proof casserole. Set over element on low to melt. Stir in rice, then sugar. Stir for 5 minutes or until the sugar melts.

Add in both milks, stirring. Bring to a simmer. Remove from heat. Stir in zest. Cover casserole with foil and bake for 1 ½ hours, stirring every 30 minutes.

While the pudding cooks, make the sauce. Put raspberries, sugar and lime juice in small saucepan over low. Heat, stirring, for 4 to 5 minutes or until the sugar has dissolved and the raspberries start to soften.

Serve the pudding with warm topped with the sauce.

*Option : if you don’t want to make the sauce, serve the pudding plain, or with raisins mixed in or with a dollop of high-quality red jam on top.

IMG_20181109_213915

Boil, Boil, Toil, and Trouble

Preserving the Harvest Without all the Hassle

I grew up on a farm and by this time of year the shelves in our cellar were filled with colourful rows of canning jars while bushel baskets brimmed with apples, pears, potatoes, turnip and squash. Upstairs, our freezer was filled with family-sized bags of beans, peas, carrots and corn from the garden. My parents (and kids once we were old enough) worked together to make our harvest last longer. I loved hearing the “pop” of mason jars as they came out of the canning kettles and cooled on the counter, and watching cucumbers change into the pickles seemed like magic. However, preserving all these fruits and vegetables also seemed like a lot of work! Thankfully, WPL has a large selection of books that make canning, preserving, freezing, fermenting, and storing fruits and vegetables manageable and foolproof.

The canning books at WPL explain everything involved in food preservation, such as pectin, acidity levels, the equipment you need, and the steps to follow to prevent bacteria from ruining your efforts. Each of these books have different tips and recipes. Here are my favourites:

  • Ball is a huge brand name in canning supplies. Their book Ball Canning: back to basics: a foolproof guide to canning jams, jellies, pickles & more explains the whole canning process in simple terms. The book also includes chapters on fruit, fruit butters and sauces, and tomatoes. Each chapter begins with a list of what you will need, tips, and the steps to follow. There is also a “problem solver” and a chart for metric equivalents.
  • Preserving: the canning and freezing guide for All Seasons by Pat Crocker is a beautiful book containing over 500 pages of recipes and information. I especially like that this book is divided by season. You might think the season for many fruits and vegetables is over but there are more than 200 pages for fall and winter produce!
  • The Canning Kitchen: 101 simple small batch recipes by Amy Bronee has a colourful picture for every recipe. I really liked how the author explains the whole canning process in the first few introductory chapters.
  • Foolproof Preserving: a guide to small batch jams, jellies, pickles, condiments & more by America’s Test Kitchen is full of colourful pictures showing you exactly how the food should look at different points throughout the process.
  • Canning & Preserving: 80+ simple, small-batch recipes by Good Housekeeping also includes some recipes to use with their preserved items, such as “Sour Cream-Vanilla Pound Cake with Rhubarb Compote” or “Reuben Macaroni and Cheese.”
  • For those who prefer to watch someone else does canning before trying it themselves, check out the DVD Homestead Blessing: the art of canning. The West Ladies teach the basics of canning equipment and storage, offering advice, tips and tricks.

Freezing is another way to preserve your harvest. The Best Freezer Cookbook by Jan Main provides general tips for freezing, as well as what types of packaging to use, how long items keep, and how to better organize your freezer. It also teaches you how to freeze fresh fruits and specific types of vegetables. This book includes a chart for a whole month of meals, and all the recipes are included.

Fermented vegetables are not only another great way to preserve food but they are full of probiotics and nutrients, help digestion, and support our immune system. Fermented Vegetables: creative recipes for fermenting 64 vegetables & herbs in  krauts, kimchis, brined pickles, chutneys, relishes & pastes by Christopher and Kirsten K. Shockey teaches the science behind fermentation and the tools needed. The Shockeys also wrote Fiery Ferments: 70 stimulating recipes for hot sauces, spicy chutneys, kimchis with kick, and other blazing fermented condiments.

Karen Solomon’s Can It, Bottle It, Smoke It : and other kitchen projects goes beyond preserving just fruits and vegetables. Solomon’s chapter entitled “Spoon It” includes recipes for cornflakes and puffed rice. The “Stock It” chapter has recipes for vanilla extract and Worcestershire sauce.  And another chapter, called “Bake It”, has recipes for bagels, pizza dough, and cakes in a jar with “Stalk It” chapter shows you how to make corn tortillas and chips.

WPL also has books for keeping your harvest in cold storage. Root Cellaring: natural cold storage of fruits & vegetables by Mike and Nancy Bubel explains what types of fruits and vegetables keep well and at what temperature and humidity levels. The authors describe the different types of storage that are possible, how to plan your own root cellar, and how to prepare the items to help prevent spoilage. Recipes at the back of the book will help you use the inventory you’ve stored. The Everything Root Cellaring Book: learn to store, cook, and preserve fresh produce all year round by Catherine Abbott covers the same topics as Root Cellaring and also has lots of recipes. However, this book also includes information on how to dry foods and herbs, as well as chapters on canning, preserving, and freezing.

If you didn’t have time or space for an edible garden this year, don’t despair!  St. Jacobs Farmers’ Market always has plenty of delicious fruits and vegetables plus visiting the market is a great way to support our local farmers. I encourage you to take your favourites from the garden, market or store, and browse our collection to find the preservation recipes you will enjoy in the cold months to come.

— Sandy W.