Bring on the Dishes!

I have never had a dishwasher. Growing up, my sister and I WERE the dishwasher in our house. When I flew the nest, I opted for extra storage space in my little kitchen over having another large appliance in the room. And to be honest, I don’t mind washing dishes. I’m not a huge fan of drying (usually my husband does that chore) but washing dishes, not a big deal at all.

Having a small kitchen, you learn to be efficient and organized in meal prep. An “A type” personality, I can quite happily make a roast beef dinner with all the trimmings and bake a dessert at the same time without my limited counter space and single sink teeming with cookware, bowls etc.

I don’t know if it’s because of being able to neatly “juggle” or something else entirely but I’ve just never been drawn to crockpots, instant-pots or one-pan meals. I know they are super popular all year round and must be quite handy in the hot days of summer, especially with those who do not have a/c at home. Perhaps if I had a big family to feed I’d be more welcoming to anything that is dish-saving and time-saving but I don’t, so while instant-pots seem to be in every home, there isn’t one in mine which means I’m unable to review any of those specific cookbooks at WPL. On the heels of the Instant-pot craze, though, it seems that one-dish cookbooks have regained their popularity. That I can do.

The first one I borrowed was One Pan, Whole Family : more than 70 complete weeknight meals by Carla Snyder. There were a number of interesting recipes between the covers and for the most part the instructions looked straight forward. The majority of the recipes take 45 minutes or less to prepare. The down side, the recipes I was most intrigued by would require me to make a return trip to the grocery store for key ingredients. So, I made a few “notes to self” and may revisit this book at a future date.

The second was 13 x 9 The Pan That Can : 150 fabulous recipes by Better Homes & Gardens.  As they describe it, the 13 x 9 (or 9 x 13) pan is “… the star of the kitchen, able to produce just about any dish from one-pan dinners to an easy big-batch dessert.” and the cookbook reflects this with recipes for all sorts of dinners, pizzas, breakfast bakes, bars and more. Nutritional information is provided for each recipe as well as ideas on making the recipes more healthy plus make ahead tips and “flex it” advice which is practical suggestions on how to make the recipe meatless, incorporate leftovers and more.

I tried two recipes from “13 x 9 The Pan That Can”. First up, Lemon Chicken With Potatoes. One of my favourite recipes of all time is the “Barefoot Contessa” Ina Garten’s roast chicken with lemon and lots of garlic. It’s a winner…always delicious and juicy. So, this seemed similar but different. The only change I made to the recipe was eliminating the olives (my husband is decidedly anti-olive) and it turned out quite good. Not as good as Ina’s if I’m honest, but tasty enough to make again. For dessert I tried the Bananas Foster Bake. Bananas, rum, oat streusel topping. What’s not to like? Wellll…we had a mixed result here. My husband absolutely loved it and went back for seconds. Me, I wasn’t impressed with the flavour or the mixture of textures and didn’t even finish my portion.

Odd as it may sound, in the end I’d be more likely to recommend One Pan, Whole Family with its many mouthwatering-sounding recipes over 13 x 9. The recipes in 13 x 9 just didn’t wow me and the results of my test recipes were mixed. But you borrow them from the library and be the judge.

— Sandi H.

Lemon Chicken and Potatoes

4 chicken breast halves, fresh or thawed
1 lb fingerling or baby Yukon potatoes
3 lemons, halves crosswise
1/3 c. pitted green and/or black olives
6 tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper
1 tbsp honey
6 c arugula or mixed salad greens

Preheat oven to 450F.

Place chicken, potatoes, lemons and olives in ungreased 9 x 13/3 quart casserole. Drizzle with 2 tbsp olive oil and toss to coat.

Rearrange chicken in a single layer, skin side up, and lemons cut-side up. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and rose uncovered for 30 minutes or until chicken is cooked through.

Remove from oven. Remove lemons from casserole. Cover chicken/potatoes/olives with foil to keep warm.

When lemons are cool enough to handle, squeeze juice in to small bowl. Remove any seeds. Whisk in 4 tbsp olive oil and honey. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serve chicken and potatoes over greens. Drizzle with lemon dressing.

We have a great summer read for you!

Summer is upon us and that means a double edition of Featured Titles! With 14 Non-Fiction and 14 Fiction titles to choose from, we’re sure you will find a book (or two or … ) to sit back, relax, and enjoy the summer sun with.

Looking for even more great reads? Check out our Staff Picks List for Summer 2019 too.

We hope you have a wonderful summer full of beautiful weather, happy times with family and friends and, of course, great reads!

Mind & Matter

Beach read, smeach read. I think that we should all read anything we want in the summer – spin the wheel and pick a genre, any genre. The New Yorker (available to us online, 24-hours a day, through RBdigital) published an article which unveiled the truth behind the summer reading season.

It turns out that the whole summer reading phenomenon is a put-up job created by the publishing industry at the turn of the last century. Those clever marketing people just wanted to sell more books! When vacation getaways became popular, thanks to railways and steamships, they got to work and made sure that their product would be ready for packing into stylish suitcases. They repackaged older titles as “summer” editions (I know that I would be fooled by this – I can easily be taken in by a book with a straw hat on the cover), encouraged their authors to write novels set on campsites and summer resorts and poof, made the summer novel an important part of the publishing market. Well, it all worked out well for them, didn’t it?

Now it seems like every newspaper and magazine we receive here in the library runs a feature on summer reads, beach reads, resort reads or cottage reads. Men’s Health magazine (available on the shelf and through RBdigital) has even promoted books that are ‘unsung beach reads’ in their July/August issue. I’m in favour of this, wholeheartedly. Let’s all read more!

I recently fell so hard for a book that didn’t have a straw hat on the cover and looks more like a back-to-school title than anything else but I encourage you to rush out and grab a copy. Mind and Matter, the memoir by former Baltimore Ravens offensive lineman John Urschel is not your typical NFL story. It’s really not like any book I’ve ever read before. The subtitle of his book is “a life in math and football” because at the time his book was published John was working towards his PhD in math at MIT. Not something might expect to read about a former NFL player and maybe that is what makes this book a fantastic read. I read it, one of my daughters read it and then my husband picked it up and we all have not stopped talking about it whenever we can move conversation towards the topic of John Urschel. If we have talked to you in the last few weeks we have probably mentioned him.

Although he was born in Winnipeg, Urschel had moved to Buffalo by the time he attended high school. He began to play football because he was inspired by his father’s college career and saw it as a way to be popular. Urschel enjoyed the sport and loved being on a team right away but it wasn’t easy. He worked hard, practiced at home and had extra coaching from his father so that he could catch up with kids who were far stronger players. But something that did come easy to him, even at a very young age, were puzzles and math.

When John Urschel was just 13 his mother arranged for him to audit a college-level Calculus course because she knew that he would enjoy it so much. They played a little game where she would let him have the change from their shopping trips if he could calculate the tax before the cashier finished tallying their purchases. She had to stop that quickly as his mental work was so quick.

Everything Urschel writes in this autobiography is very matter of fact, partially because he wants to tell a convincing story about following the path that feels right to you, even when people around you are telling you it isn’t the right one, and all of the little glimpses he shares about his younger grades just jump off the page.

He wrote this book with the assistance of his partner, author Louisa Thomas, and it is honest and inspiring (even when he gets down to the nitty gritty of explaining a multi-step logic problem). Urschel made the choice to accept a scholarship to Penn State in 2010 although his mother was pressuring him to attend Stanford because he felt like their football team would be the best fit for him. When he arrives on their campus it’s the first step in a long journey to the NFL and this half of his life story is filled with exactly what you would expect – grueling workouts, games out of town, making lifelong friendships with other players and fighting to keep his spot on the roster. Learning about his time at Penn State is particularly interesting as he was there during the time that football players were sanctioned for the acts of their former coach Jerry Sandusky. It’s the first of many moments in John’s life that the reader feels like they have that “fly on the wall” experience.

When Urschel was selected by the Baltimore Ravens in the 2014 draft he had completed his master’s degree and even published a paper in an academic journal. At this time in his football career he was starting to feel the pull of his academic interests but still wanted to stay with the team. Incredibly he was able to balance both his school world and the life of an NFL player. It’s wonderful to read the story of his management saying that now that he is signed to a big football contract it’s time to do something about the horrible car he has been driving. Urschel had been driving the same car for years so he agreed to this and asked that they order him a Nissan Versa. A new one, certainly, but not the type of car you would expect of someone who has just signed an NFL contract. And definitely a slightly smaller car than would comfortably fit an offensive lineman. It’s a story that is constantly fascinating.

Something you would expect in a memoir about a football player is for it to discuss concussions. He talks about the possibility of injury, brain and body, throughout his career and the part they play in his life. Each time he considers whether he will continue on in the sport this is something that is on his mind and he spends time in the book discussing how he is able to compartmentalize his feelings about injuries. He is aware of the chance he could develop CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) and addresses his concerns. He is honest about how it might change the direction of his career as a mathematician but he continues to work at both math and football with equal passion despite experiencing a concussion during Ravens training camp in August of 2015.

His love of football and mathematics are interwoven perfectly throughout the book and that is one of the things that make it such a pleasure to read – the balance. He gives equal weight to both and as you read you can see why he devotes so much to making both parts of his life a success. This isn’t an autobiography that gives much detail outside of those two pursuits but this helps you to see why he does so well in both vocations. He occasionally mentions other players on his teams, shares details about the mentors he has at the universities or says how much he enjoys the campus where he lives but there are very few incidental moments shared about how he spent his life. At the end of the book you realize the reason for this is because it’s likely he didn’t have much extra time between playing a competitive sport and his academic life. Well, he does mention wanting to take a break at one point, and this is when he takes up chess in a more serious way. He had enjoyed it off and on throughout his life but when he decides he needs it for a change of pace he orders specialized books, studies the most famous games, and finds himself spending hours contemplating a particular position on the board.

Finally Urschel does find that his life at MIT is the more appealing one. He acknowledges that either football or mathematics would benefit from his full-time attention and he knows that he is looking forward to going back to school more than being at ‘work’ on the football field. It isn’t a decision that he makes easily (and in an interview I read he says that he does miss his NFL pay cheque) and he notes that his fiancé and their daughter factor into his retirement from the NFL.

At a young age John Urschel decided that he wanted to choose an unexpected career path and put everything he could into making his unlikely future happen. In Mind and Matter he has written an inspiring, enjoyable memoir that can be enjoyed by readers of all ages – whether they enjoy math or football or neither of those things – his story is so compelling. And, if you want to, skip ahead to the logic puzzle it is on pages 8 through 12 (yes, it takes 5 pages to describe this puzzle and the solution, he is the real deal).

— Penny M.

Facing My Fear

“Limits, like fear, are often an illusion.” – Michael Jordan

I once had a tragic happening in my kitchen that scarred me for life. Well. Okay. That’s me being overly dramatic but it was a baking fail that I’ve never forgotten or confronted, until now.

Many years ago (and that, actually, isn’t an exaggeration) I attempted to make bread. Not bread machine bread. Real bread. From scratch. I found a recipe for French bread in a long-forgotten cookbook borrowed from the library. It was, apparently, suitable for beginners and that was me!

I don’t remember the process but I do remember that the dough rose okay for the first proofing, almost no second rise, and the result was bread that would have only been suitable for anchoring a small boat. I was so put off by that failure that I never made anything using yeast again.

My personal opinion (or excuse, if you prefer) was that a person needed to have a certain touch to make bread, or pastry for that matter. Then I recently saw “Bake It Better : Sweet Buns & Breads” by Linda Collister on the new book display at the library.

I took a quick flick through. It’s divided into three sections: Easy Does It, Needs a Little Skill, and Up for a Challenge. I immediately saw a number of recipes in the easy section that I’d love to try. So, I took a deep breath, checked the book out and decided to face my fear!

I started off with something that was a bread but didn’t involve yeast: scones. I love scones (and prefer when it is pronounced so that it rhymes with “yawns”, thanks very much) and have a good recipe courtesy of my Mum. The Bake It Better recipe has just 6 ingredients and a basic method. I didn’t have any buttermilk so went with their recommended substitute of a milk and yogurt combination. The scones were fantastic! And just in case you think I’m dissing the family recipe, my Mum tried them as well and concurred. She loved them as much as I did. That recipe is going to become a standard in our home.

IMG_20190406_1955158Then it was time to try…yeast. I liked the look of the Devonshire Splits. They are small rolls with a soft crumb served split in half and filled with cream and jam. How could you not like the look of that? I followed the step-by-step instructions carefully and appreciated the images shared as well as advice on kneading. Imagine my surprise when the dough rose beautifully. I knocked it down with my knuckles, divided the dough, shaped it and, like magic, it rose again. I was ridiculously excited. I think my husband thought I was losing my mind (again). Fifteen minutes later and they were out of the oven and looked exactly like the photo in the book. They tasted divine even without the cream and jam. Soft crumb, lightly sweetened and truly, it was hard to eat just one!

With new found confidence I also made hot cross buns and a milk and honey loaf. Both recipes turned out really well. I was elated and amazed. I am now a happy baker of bread and am looking forward to the day when I graduate to “Needs a Little Skill” and “Up for a Challenge”!

I will note that one minor downfall of this little British cookbook is the measurements being listed in grams and millilitres. A previous borrower had actually penned the conversions to cups right in the margin, a practice we don’t support here at the library of course but unfortunately it does happen. My suggestion: just use an online converter on your favourite device. No pen required.

  • Sandi H.

Devonshire Splits

400 grams strong white bread flour plus extra for dusting
6 grams salt
1 tsp sugar
60 grams butter, at room temperature, diced small
1 – 7 gram sachet fast-action dried yeast
250 ml lukewarm milk
Vegetable oil for dusting
Icing sugar for dusting

To serve: clotted or whipped cream and raspberry jam or preserves

DIRECTIONS

Put the flour, salt and sugar in a mixing bowl. Add the pieces of butter and rub in with the tips of your fingers until the mixture looks like fine crumbs. Sprinkle the yeast into the bowl and thoroughly mix in. Make a well in the centre.

Pour the lukewarm milk into the flour mixture. Work in with your hands until you have a soft dough. If it feels at all dry or crumbly, add in milk (just a tablespoon at a time). If the dough sticks to your hands or the sides of the bowl, add more flour.

Rub a little oil on the worktop. Don’t sprinkle it with flour. Scrape out the dough and knead until very pliable and satiny smooth (10 minutes). Return the dough to bowl. Cover with clingfilm or a snap-on lid. Leave to rise on worktop for 60 minutes or until double in size.

Punch down to deflate dough. Lightly dust work service with flour. Knead once or twice. Divide dough into 12 equal portions. Cover with dry tea towel to rest for 5 minutes.

Shape into balls. Set out on lined baking sheet. Slip the sheet into an extra large plastic bag, trapping air inside but making sure that the plastic won’t touch the dough even when it rises again.

Leave the to rise for 45 minutes. The dough will double in size again.

Preheat oven to 425 F. Uncover the buns – they will now be touching – and bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until golden brown.

As soon as they are done, set the sheet on a wire rack and sift icing sugar over the top. Carefully slide the rolls onto the cooling rack. Cover them with a dry tea towel and let cool until barely warm.

Uncover and gently pull the buns apart. When ready to serve, slice each ¾ of the way across. Spread with jam and cream. Serve immediately.

Time Flies

When I recently borrowed Cooking for Friends by David Wood, I received a shock. I remember the first David Wood cookbook I borrowed. Not his iconic Food Book but, unsurprisingly for those who know me or read my blog posts, The Dessert Book. I could even recall the cover, which featured an amazing-looking strawberry pie which I proceed to make and, yes, it tasted amazing too.

Seeing a new book by David Wood on the shelves, I just had to borrow it. The shock came when I realized it was 30 years (!!) since his Dessert Book was published which meant 30 years has passed since I made that bit of strawberry bliss! How is that possible when I’m barely over 30 myself? 😉 I even visited Wood’s gourmet food shop in Toronto once and treated myself to some decadent goodies.

Wood was born and raised in post-war Scotland where food was rationed and was viewed as something to fuel the body rather than rhapsodize over. As a young adult, Wood honed his cooking skills and his tastes became, like most people, more refined as he matured. Moving to Canada in 1973, he opened the first of three gourmet food shops 1984. A catering business and two cookbooks soon followed. In the 1990s, following some tough times including the closure of his shops, Wood left Toronto for the warmer climes of BC and in 1996 opened Salt Spring Island Cheese Company after “…six years of trial and error on the farm and in the kitchen.”

As Wood says in the Introduction to “Cooking for Friends” (which is worth reading, as is the forward), “…the best thing about food is that it brings us together with friends and family (who are also friends) – it eases conversations and opens our hearts and minds…” This cookbook is about creating delicious, satisfying and attractive food at home, without needing the skills of a professional chef.

I chose to make just one sweet (although the Pear and Ginger Galette will definitely be on the menu at my house at a future family get together), a starter and two mains. The dessert recipe I tried was Lemon Possets. The recipe contains just 3 ingredients but the result is a smooth, citrusy custard that is just divine. You can decorate the possets with a raspberry or two and some lemon zest or just eat as is. Wood’s Chicken Wonderful is, well, wonderful! He recommends serving it with salad and a baguette but we opted for a mixture of steamed broccoli and cauliflower. Easy and scrumptious. I could happily eat this once a week.

The Spicy Garlic Shrimp would be a wonderful starter but the night I made it we enjoyed the shrimp as a main, perched atop my own un-fried vegetable fried rice. My favourite of the four recipes tried though was the Tagliatelle with Salmon, Crème Fraiche and Chives. This dish looked and tasted amazing even though I substituted a mixture of sour cream and yogurt for the crème fraiche. Served with a glass of chilled Oyster Bay chardonnay from New Zealand it was a treat on a weeknight. Yes, easy enough to make at the end of the work day.

Cooking for Friends would be a wonderful addition to any collection. This Canadian cookbook features beautiful photos, an excellent selection of recipes and clear, concise directions. Two whisks up from me!

— Sandi H.

Tagliatelle with Salmon, Crème Fraiche and Chives

2 egg yolks
2 c. crème fraiche (or try a yogurt/sour cream substitute like I did!)
½ c grated Parmesan
¼ c chopped fresh chives
1 tsp grated lemon zest
1 tsp ground black pepper
2 tblsp chopping Italian parsley + some for garnish
12 oz boneless fresh salmon fillet
1 tsp salt
1 lb. fresh tagliatelle

In a small bowl beat together yolks, ½ c of the crème fraiche, Parmesan, chives, zest, pepper and parsley. Set aside.

In a pot big enough to hold the cooked, drained pasta, bring the remained 1 ½ c. crème fraiche to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer.

Carefully cut the salmon into 1/4” slices, then cut the slices across into strips, each about the size of 4 matchsticks tied together. Set aside.

Cook the pasta in salted boiling water. Drain when done, reserving 1 c of the cooking water.

Transfer the pasta to the large pot containing the warmed crème fraiche and stir to coat. Add in the egg yolk mixture and stir to combine. Use cooking liquid as need to prevent the pasta from drying out or the sauce from becoming too thick. Add salmon and stir very gently to avoid breaking up the fish. The heat from the pasta will cook the thin strips of salmon perfectly.

Note: I chose to bake the salmon whole and serve the tagliatelle on the side.

salmon_blog

The Path Made Clear

In all my years of reading, I’ve come to understand that I’m a mood reader. While many would argue that it’s important to be selective with what you read, I’d argue that when you read a particular book is just as important. How many books have you put aside because you weren’t in the mood for it? It’s difficult to predict when you are in the mood for a particular book, but when you select the right book at the right time, it’s a defining experience. Most times this moment is serendipitous, and you pick up the book you need most without even knowing it.

My most recent experience with this happened last week. My mom surprised me with a copy of The Path Made Clear by Oprah Winfrey. At first, I was confused. It was a new release I hadn’t heard of, and it wasn’t fiction (my go-to genre). All she said was, “I really think you need to read this.”

I’ll admit, I was skeptical at first. I’ve never read a self-help book before. I didn’t know how a stranger giving life advice would have any resounding impact on me. While advice from a trusted friend or family member is usually helpful (or at least intended to be helpful), could this book really help me find my purpose even if it is Oprah of all people leading the way? It’s just like when your parent tries to tell you not to do something, but you do it anyway. I assumed that applied to self-help books.

I set aside my uncertainties, and I discovered that The Path Made Clear is a guide that offers the framework to help you discover your life’s direction and purpose. No matter what life stage you find yourself in, this book can certainly help you evaluate, or re-evaluate, your life’s significance. Are you looking to find your purpose? Are you struggling to find meaning? What fulfills you? Who do you want to be? How do you want to make your mark in this world? This book provides the tools and wisdom to begin a discussion with yourself.

The book is divided into ten chapters that include reflections, interviews, and anecdotes from notable professionals in a variety of fields from the likes of Trevor Noah to Deepak Chopra. Each chapter begins with an introduction from Oprah herself who sets the theme of the chapter while encouraging you to reflect on who you are, what is meaningful to you, and how can you work towards actualizing that meaning.

This book comes at a time where I am in the midst of questioning my own life purpose, and how I wanted to contribute to our world in a meaningful way. While you shouldn’t expect to find fully formed answers in this book, I did find insights that made me pause and reflect. In a world full of expectation and noise, it can be especially difficult to listen to your inner voice when everything tries to drown it out. I started listening, wondering, and envisioning through each chapter.

If you’re looking for an uplifting and thoughtful discourse regarding meaning and purpose, then I think you should definitely borrow The Path Made Clear by Oprah Winfrey. If you’re also a fan of Oprah and her work on screen and on the page, you’ll also appreciate her latest book.

Maybe it’s Oprah, but this book was able to uplift me in a time when I felt stuck in the ground. But we don’t have to be stuck. As Oprah writes, “life is about growth and change, and when you are no longer doing either, you’ve received your first whisper” (45).

My Mom may have been right on this one (but don’t tell her).

— Eleni Z.

In a Reading Slump

Reading slumps are the worst. People come to WPL staff to ask for help with these every week and they can happen to anyone. For so many reasons. Sometimes the books you have been enjoying just aren’t cutting it anymore. In other situations, life is making it difficult to enjoy reading as you normally might or there might be a time when you can’t pinpoint the reason but you just need help getting out of a rough spot.

I have been smack in the middle of one of a reading slump since my mother died. I used to turn to books for comfort and it’s not working as it used to. I take shiny books home and read them but they aren’t giving me the same happiness. I find it difficult to retain anything beyond the bare bones of the plot even with books from my favourite series. Flavia’s last adventure involved her sister’s wedding but the rest is a blur. What to do?

Well, we don’t give up around here. Have you ever seen a group of library staff trying to find an answer to a really tough question? We LOVE to answer the hard questions. I’m very sure that the term “leave no stone unturned” originated in a library. My theory is that it’s likely that a group of librarians* were trying to find the answer to a question about something like properties of bricks and masonry in European buildings of the early 1900s and someone said “…leave no stone unturned.” because it was a clever pun.

When someone experiencing a downturn in reading happiness comes to the desk it has been my habit to ask what they read in the past. If they are open to reading “anything” then I might to suggest that they dip into some recently published non-fiction. The treat of a well-written non-fiction book is that you can set it down easily after a chapter or two and feel like you have accomplished something. Reading non-fiction is satisfying and can also help you to easily channel your reading towards a particular topic and steer clear of others.

Often customers who are caught in the middle of a slump know that they need to avoid certain topics. In my case I know that I will not enjoy reading anything about health care, aging parents, mother-daughter relationships or well, I guess anything about hair care, cooking, and shopping. The non-fiction shelves at WPL have been good to me recently. Matt Haig’s recent book was an opportunity to rethink some less healthy habits like focusing on the bad news in the newspaper each morning and trying on some new ones like spending more time outside and connecting with friends. Small goals. Notes on a Nervous Planet was the kind of book that was fun to fall into every time I picked it up. I felt like I was getting to spend time with the author and see the world through his eyes each time. It’s memoir with and a dash of self-help and a soupçon of technology advice. I found it to be very useful, it passed the time and it can be enjoyed by any reader.

If we are fighting a reading slump then we need a book or series that is truly good. Not a by-the-numbers thriller or standard romance. A great book can break through a downtrend in reading pleasure and help to return a reader to that place where books can be pulled from the shelf with abandon. I have a list of authors that I keep to give to someone who is suffering from the “yips” in their reading habits. These must have enough story to keep you turning the pages, can’t be about a serious health issue or death, about coping with a family crisis or the aftermath of one, and should not be about a topic that is too light-hearted. If a book character’s life is so perfect then it can be a bit hard to take. No thank you. Favourites from our shelves include books by Nina George (oh, The Little Paris Bookshop), Julia Stuart, Rainbow Rowell, Jenny Colgan, and Louis De Bernières.

Take home two or three books, put one or more on hold, and be ready to try again. Curing a reading slump doesn’t happen easily and sometimes it takes more than one attempt. Often the remedy isn’t found on the new books shelf and will come from a trusted back-list novel that has been sitting on the shelf, just waiting to go home and perform a reading rescue. I once passed along Robin Sloan’s Mr. Penumbra’s 24-hour Bookstore to someone and had them return to say that it kept them going through a difficult weekend.

I’m thrilled to say that I was pulled from my funk by Elinor Lipman’s most recent book. It’s so bright and unexpected with characters who are absolutely charming. I’m still thinking of them and will be reading her past books as well. Can’t wait. In Good Riddance Daphne Maritch inherits her mother’s yearbook and is at the mercy of an annoying neighbour who finds the yearbook after she recycles it in their apartment building. Why do their paths cross? This horrible neighbour thinks the 1968 yearbook would be a great subject for her next documentary and will not return it. She absolutely will not. Even worse, she wants Daphne to help her with the documentary. Horrible neighbour. Daphne spends the rest of the book trying to sort out her life, her feelings about her family, and prevent this film project from ever happening. She does this with the support of her part-time professional dog walking father and a terrific across-the-hall neighbour who is a part of the “Riverdale” cast. It’s tremendously fun, despite the difficulties surrounding the yearbook debacle, and Daphne is trying her best throughout. It is quirky, lovely and was just the thing to brighten my reading mood. I didn’t know I would love it before I picked it up. Actually, I was pretty sure that I wouldn’t like it. I hadn’t really liked reading anything for months. That’s how it is with getting rid of the dreaded reading slump. The cure comes in surprising forms. So, come to the desk and ask us to help you find one. It’s what we do.

— Penny M.

*There is quite a debate online about the collective noun for a group of librarians. You know, like a group of crows is called a “murder” of crows and a group of ants is a “colony”. I have seen postings which say a group of librarians could be called a “stack of librarians” or a “volume of librarians”. I think my very favourite of them all was “a collection of librarians” but in the end the very best answer was from someone who just said “Ask us.”

Fascinated by Queen Victoria

Good old Queen Victoria was born on May 24, 1819…200 years ago!! Queen Victoria may be long dead and gone, yet in a way she lives on. She lent her name and birthday to the glorious long weekend we are now celebrating. And she lives on in numerous place and street names around the globe as well as inspiration for books and movies.

My daughter and I recently decided we wanted to watch a TV series together, something British. We selected Victoria and steadily worked our way through Seasons 1 and 2. We were enthralled — addicted? — from the get go! Just so you know, this is NOT your stout, dowdy, “we are not amused” Queen Victoria. This is a young, vibrant Victoria (just 18 years of age when she came to the throne), a headstrong Victoria filled with steely determination to do things her own way. Viewers are treated to pomp and circumstance, romance (both royal and below stairs variety), juicy scandal, and plenty of scheming and intrigue.

The cast is superb. Jenna Coleman plays Queen Victoria, Tom Hughes is her husband, Prince Albert, and Rufus Sewell portrays Lord Melbourne, the prime minister. I have to confess to a secret hankering after the Prince Ernst character (David Oakes), the oh-so-handsome and charming but badly-behaved older brother of Prince Albert.

Season 3 of Victoria comes out on DVD later this month. Cannot wait!

As we watched the series, I also read the companion book, Victoria by Daisy Goodwin, the creator and writer of the TV series. Highly enjoyable. Looking for more Victoria-inspired reading or viewing? Here are a couple of newish offerings I would recommend: Victoria & Abdul (DVD) and Queen Victoria: twenty four days that changed her life (book) by Lucy Worsley.

I have become quite fascinated with Queen Victoria, so I will leave you with two facts I bet you did not know. First, when Victoria was born the chances of her ever becoming queen were extremely remote as she was the daughter of the fourth son of the old King. Also, when Queen Victoria died (in 1901) she was the longest reigning monarch in British history (at 63 years) … though that record has recently been surpassed by her great-great granddaughter, the present Queen, at 67 years, and counting.

Happy Victoria Day!

— Penny D.

It’s Genius

I recently borrowed Food 52’s latest cookbook, Genius Desserts : 100 recipes that will change the way you bake. After reading it through and trying 3 different recipes, I can’t say it has changed the way I bake BUT the recipes are certainly genius. Each one was awesome and I’ve already made a list of others that I want to try out.

Food52 is an award-winning kitchen and home brand. Established almost 10 years ago, their mandate is to help followers “…eat thoughtfully and live joyfully.” They have an extensive team behind the scenes led by CEO and Co-Founder, Amanda Hesser. She herself has written a few books including Cooking for Mr. Latte : A Food Lover’s Courtship, with Recipes, The Cook and the Gardener, and The Essential New York Times Cookbook. The Food52 website won a James Beard award and with over 4 million followers on social media, I think I am not alone in being pleased with the look of their books and online presence as well as being very satisfied with the recipe results.

The content shared in print and online by Food 52 is a mix of food, cooking, design, culture, and travel. The recipes shared are from talented home cooks as well as celebrity chefs like Nigella Lawson, Jacques Pépin, and Madhur Jaffrey.

food 52 004The first recipes I tried were for cookies: Dorie Greenspan & Pierre Herme’s “World Peace Cookies” and Julia Moskin’s “Peanut Butter Sandies”. I decided to bring them to the library for staff to taste test. While both plates emptied quickly, the World Peace Cookies were the hands down winners. Comments included “Those chocolate cookies are the best!”, “Nice texture and not over-the-top chocolatey.” and “The World Peace cookie was very good. I didn’t find it too sweet and the addition of chocolate chips was a pleasant surprise.” That recipe is a keeper!

Next up was “One Step, No Churn Coffee Ice Cream” by a favourite of mine, Nigella Lawson. I do have a Pampered Chef Ice Cream Maker (which is amazing, btw) but I was intrigued by this no-frills recipe. There are just 4 ingredients and the only equipment needed is an electric mixer and a freezer. Basically, you just beat the ingredients together until airy, place the mixture in a container with an airtight lid and freeze overnight. The resulting ice cream is SUPER rich and decadent which means you don’t need to eat very much to be satisfied. I’d definitely try this again with some other flavours.

I have plans to make the Guinness Stout Ginger Cake next although I will be skipping the Parsley Cake on the page that precedes it. Parsley Cake aside, there are plenty just begging to be tried: Pistachio Millionaire’s Shortbread with Coriander Butterscotch, Weird & Wonderful Banana Cake (which sounds just that!) and Butterscotch Budino to name but three.

Embrace your inner genius. Borrow this book. Give the recipes a whirl. You won’t be disappointed.

  • Sandi H.

P.S. after writing this post I did make the Stout Spice Gingerbread and it was out of this world. It’s going to become a staple in our household.

World Peace Cookies

1 ¼ c. all-purpose flour
1/3 c. unsweetened cocoa powder
½ tsp baking soda
½ c plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
2/3 c. packed light brown sugar
¼ c. granulated sugar
½ tsp. fine sea salt
1 tsp. vanilla
¾ c mini chocolate chips

Sift the flour, cocoa and baking soda together. Set aside.

In a large bowl, beat the butter on medium speed until soft and creamy. Add both sugars, the salt and vanilla extract and beat for 2 minutes more. Turn off the mixer.

Pour in the dry ingredients and mix at low speed just until flour is mixed in.  Stir in chocolate chips.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Gather it together and divide it in half. Working with one half at a time, shape the dough into logs that are 1 ½  inches in diameter. Wrap the logs in plastic wrap and refrigerate them for at least 3 hours. (The dough can be refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 2 months. If you’ve frozen the dough, you needn’t defrost it before baking — let it warm just enough so that you can slice the log into rounds and bake the cookies 1 minute longer.)

Preheat oven to 325F. Grease baking sheets. Remove dough from fridge. Using a sharp thin knife, slice the logs into rounds that are 1/2 inch thick. The rounds are likely to crack as you’re cutting them — don’t be concerned, just squeeze the bits back onto each cookie.

Arrange the rounds on the baking sheets, leaving about 1 inch between them. Bake the cookies one sheet at a time for 12 minutes — they won’t look done, nor will they be firm, but that’s just the way they should be.

Transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack and let the cookies rest until they are only just warm, at which point you can serve them or let them reach room temperature.

The Hottest Titles for Spring 2019

The snow has melted, and dreams of lounging in the sun will soon be a reality. What better way to welcome the new season than with a good book or two from our  Spring Featured Titles list.

Non-Fiction

Our topics are, as ever, wide ranging on the Featured Titles List. From a study of animal emotions to a look at how Canada’s past is affecting its future to following Alex Hannold on his free solo climb up el Capitan. We have a true tale of star-crossed lovers in Sicily or you could get the buzz from Meredith May about growing up on a honeybee farm. Hungry for more? There’s the latest from writer and food critic Ruth Reichl (including recipes!) and a behind-the-scenes look at Queer Eye’s Karamo.

Fiction

There are so many great new novels coming out this spring it was difficult to select just seven! “The Stranger Diaries” is a modern gothic novel which will have you guessing at the killer’s identity until the last page. In “If, Then” by Kate Hope Day, small glimpses at another life lead four neighbours to discover something cataclysmic in their small town. A woman suspects her new neighbour was involved in an unsolved murder but will anyone believe her? “Before She Knew Him” is a must read. High school romance moves to an elite university battleground for Marianne and Connell in the award-winning “Normal People” by Sally Rooney. Wilderness survival has never been as thrilling as it is in “The River” by Peter Heller. Or if fantasy mysteries are more to your taste, give “The Binding” by Bridget Collins a try. And finally, once again focusing on the relationship between neighbours, “White Elephant” by Julie Langsdorf is a darkly humoured look at the suburban town of Willard Park as it becomes a battleground.

FT-Spring-2019