Step into the Fantasy World of Faerie

Teen Feature: Folk of the Air Series

Jude once lived in an ordinary house on an ordinary street. She watched TV and ate fish sticks drenched in ketchup like any ordinary girl. She was just a child when a man in a long dark coat took her and her sisters from the mortal world to the high court of Faerie, where nothing is ordinary. It is a realm where winged pixies, cat-faced goblins and faerie princes wear clothing made of flower petals and moth wings. They ride on giant toads and dine on bouquets of garlic and enchanted fruit.

The folk of the Faerie are not always kind to the humans who live in their world. They look down at them. They taunt their mortality. They use enchantments to torment them. Jude, despite her human limitations, refuses to be intimated. She has strength and a spirit of her own.

The Cruel Prince by Holly Black reminded me of Game of Thrones. Although it is a fantasy novel, it is really a political intrigue story at its core. It took a few chapters for me to figure out that behind this beautiful fairy tale there is a web of conspiracy. Schemes for power and position are hidden in every corner of the plot. The further you get into the story, the more the beauty of the realm fades and its true nature is revealed.

Much like Game of Thrones author George R. Martin felt none of his characters were truly good or bad, every character in The Cruel Prince has both strengths and flaws. Even Jude, as moral as she is, will resort to deception when it comes to furthering her own ambitions.

“Someone you trust has already betrayed you.”

In the second book, The Wicked King, the realm of the Undersea threatens to invade. All the while Jude continues her balancing act – letting the faerie folk believe she is just a foolish mortal while secretly pulling the strings behind the throne. Like any game of deception, she can never be sure who is plotting against her.

8e6b3b52-50e3-4294-b4ea-6cabf0136fa4-hollyblackHolly Black is a master at painting pictures with words. The court of Faerie is beautifully described in both The Cruel Prince and The Wicked King. You can almost feel yourself being weaved into this world of magic and wonder.

I completely devoured both books in this series. I hung on every word, loved every page and rooted for Jude through every step of the story.

The final book in the Folk of the Air series will be released next year. I already have it highlighted on my calendar.

— Lesley L.

The Language of Thorns

I confess – I love fairy tales. I love mermaids. I love witches. I love goblins, golems, trolls and elves. I especially love animals that talk. Add in a few magic spells and I’m hooked. There is just something about how fairy tales are written that I can’t resist. There is a benevolent hero with an impossible problem and just when everything seems to be lost *poof!* there is some sort of magical resolution and everyone lives happily ever after.  The heroes always win and villains always lose.

When Leigh Bardugo’s latest book The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (illustrated by Sara Kipin) crossed my desk, I was thrilled. It’s not often that I find fairy tales written for grownups. Not that this book is hard to miss. The front cover is adorned in bright, detailed artwork. Inside, every page has a vivid illustration. It is worth peeking through just for the art alone.

The Language of Thorns is compromised of six short stories that have similarities to popular fairy tales. You will recognize elements of classic tales such as the Nutcracker and the Little Mermaid. However, each story has a new twist. The princess doesn’t always marry the prince. The hero doesn’t always turn up to save the day. But each story will transport you to a new world of enchanted woods and mythical creatures.

Ayama and the Thorn Wood
“Interesting things only happen to pretty girls.”

A poor farmer is blessed with two daughters: one beautiful and one plain. The beautiful daughter is raised to marry a prince. The plain daughter is sent into the woods to make a treaty with a beast.

The Too-Clever Fox
“Just because you escape one trap, doesn’t mean you will escape the next.”

Koja the Fox has a talent for evading death. Armed with a silver tongue, he has outwitted every predator in the forest. One day a hunter enters the woods and Koja’s wit is put to the test.

The Witch of Duva
“Dark things have a way of slipping in through narrow spaces.

A classic fairy tale turned upside down and inside out. Witches, stepmothers and heroines have their roles reversed in this tale about missing children.

Little Knife
“But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it.”

The old Duke is blessed with a daughter of extraordinary beauty. He schemes to marry her off to the richest man in the kingdom.

The Soldier Prince                                                                                                                       “This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.”

Beware of gifts from the clocksmith. Clara could play with dolls for hours. However, when she’s given a wooden toy soldier, strange things begin to happen.

When Water Sang Fire
“I was not made to please princes.”

There have always been whispers about Ulla. That she was different somehow. But no one could deny the power of her voice. Ulla’s fate is forever changed when her song catches the attention of Prince Roffe.

Curl up with The Language of Thorns and live amongst mermaids, witches and golems for an evening. It will leave you feeling happily ever after.

-Lesley L.