The Matchmaker’s List

The Matchmaker’s List by Sonya Lalli is a heartwarming and impressive debut novel that is a mix of a few things. It’s a sweet coming-of-age story with a touch of romance, a sprinkle of humour and a dash of Canadian pride that looks at the positive aspects and complications of family, friendship, culture and community.

While it appears to be a cute romantic comedy (and it is!), Lalli also introduces several deeper issues into a story that focuses on one determined grandmother as she tries to find her single granddaughter Raina a husband. Readers get a look into the rich Canadian-Indian culture of Raina’s family and also witness the pressures it puts on three generations of women. It’s through these relationships of family and friends that Lalli shows how cultural expectations can sometimes clash with individual needs.

The story is set in “Toronno” (aka Toronto) and with Lalli’s vivid descriptions of that vibrant city and its diversity, it makes it a great setting for this story. And can I just say how much I love it when a Canadian author sets their story in Canada?!!

My only issue with the book is how Raina, in one instance, tries to curtail her grandmother’s husband hunting. It just didn’t sit well with me. While I appreciated the discussions it will create and the insight it gives readers about an aspect of the Indian community, I wasn’t fond of the execution and felt this misunderstanding went on for too long. However, it will spark some good book club discussions!

Overall, this was an enjoyable multi-cultural romance that had a touch of humour and went beyond the typical romantic fluff. I applaud the author for tackling larger issues including diversity, acceptance versus shame, multicultural and generational differences, and the deep influence tradition and culture have on people of all generations.

— Laurie P.

Have You Met The Durrells?

You know how bookstores have ‘Staff Picks”?  Well I think we should have ‘WPL Customer Picks’.  Or maybe when customers return a popular DVD or book we could keep a tally of who is reporting that it is good/bad/worth the trouble and then post it at the returns desk with a little image of a thumbs up or thumbs down.  The opinions of our neighbours should be more important than the reviews we read in the Globe & Mail or the New York Times, and I would rather watch a DVD that a WPL customer recommends rather than one that gets a high rating on Rotten Tomatoes.  In fact, I find that material suggested to me by WPL customers is a guaranteed good read or good watch.  Thumbs up!

A favourite customer ‘gifted’ me with the television miniseries The Durrells in Corfu recently and I was as smitten with the series as she so confidently said I would be.  In fact, when I placed my hold on Season One she told me that I should place a hold on season two right away as I would be sure to want to watch Season Two as well.  She was right – it was that good (I have since thanked her for her sage advice, not to worry).  The miniseries originally aired on the British television network ITV and was picked up by PBS as part of their Masterpiece series.  We are fortunate to have both seasons at WPL and when the third season is encased in plastic on our shelves I will be faithfully waiting for it to arrive.  I will have a cup of tea ready to go and might even break out a festive meal in celebration.

The television show is an adaptation of the trilogy of books that Gerald Durrell wrote about the years his family spent on the island of Corfu.  He is at the centre of the books My Family and Other Animals, Birds, Beasts and Relatives and The Garden of the Gods but the screenwriters have chosen to make his mother, Louisa, the focus of their stories.  This was a great decision on their part – it gives the series a bit of snap that might be missing if the stories all centred on a young boy.  I’m sure that it would have been lovely but not quite the masterpiece we now have to enjoy.  It is fabulous.

After struggling to raise four willful children alone on a widow’s pension in gloomy England, Louisa decides to move them to a sunny Greek paradise.  Well, Louisa decides with the enthusiastic prompting of her eldest, Larry, who is determined to be a successful novelist (and becomes one – renowned author Lawrence Durrell ). The reaction of the other three is mixed at best. The chemistry between the family members is just magical.

When Louisa, Larry, next oldest son Leslie, only daughter Margo and young Gerald arrive on the island they are warmly welcomed by a taxi driver named Spiros who becomes their interpreter, protector and negotiator for everything – a villa, furniture, and the release of their funds from the bank.  While the family waits for their money to arrive they must ‘forage’ for something to eat and this is the first of many opportunities to see the different ways that the Durrells cope with adversity.  Larry flat out refuses to help, saying that he is busy writing.  Margo says that she is looking for a job and does so by sitting on their sundrenched patio in a bikini.  Leslie, always keen to help his mother, goes out with one of his many rifles and shoots some of the local wildlife while Gerald hunts for berries but ends up eating many, feeding some to their dog, and letting the remainder spoil while he is distracted by a neighbour who offers him a puppy.  Oh, the glorious little puppies.

Gerald Durrell’s passion for animals started when began keeping local wildlife as pets. They pile up so quickly that I can’t remember them all.  He had many species of birds, several types of mice, a number of insects, plus scorpions (!), turtles, otters, tortoises, snakes. In one lovely episode he wanted a goat so, so much.  The classic W. C. Fields quote about not working with children or animals does not apply in this series because actor Milo Parker, who plays Gerald, is top-notch and the furry and feathery supporting actors are sublime.  Animals and children are everywhere and make the show that much more enjoyable.  If you were to play this series without sound you would enjoy watching it for the visuals alone.

The three older children of the Durrell family also play their parts to perfection.  Larry is an aspiring novelist who spends every day wearing his underclothes and a polka-dotted robe while he types away in his room and when forced to provide encouragement or advice to his siblings he grudgingly does so but there is love behind the snide remarks.  Poor Leslie stomps about trying to find his place in their family, on the island, in the world and says “maybe I’m not the sort who is meant to be happy” but when Larry wonders if it might be time for him to return to England and they have a real brotherly conversation it is as if the two actors have really grown up together.  There is great chemistry there.  And Margo is sublime.  I’m sure that this young actor, Daisy Waterstone, is meant for great things.  She delivers every line – comic or dramatic – with such flair.  When she confesses to a local countess, played by the exquisite Leslie Caron, “I’m a bit dim”, there is really nothing more delightful.  It is so hard to choose a favourite among this cast of wonderful actors.

Each episode finds the family getting to know their new neighbours, the culture of the island, and finding their way to a happiness that they did not have in England.  It’s not an easy journey for them, thankfully, or the series would end and it would seem far too effortless.  It’s because life is a struggle for Louisa and her children that you keep watching, you become invested in their success, whether it be in Leslie’s love life, Margo’s quest for employment, or Larry’s constant pecking away at the typewriter.  And they are doing all of this while the sun is shining, they are wearing the most colourful clothes (well, Larry is usually wearing a dressing gown) and eating glorious meals on their patio which overlooks the Ionian Sea.  What more can you ask of a miniseries?  I read some terrific news online (there are spoilers about Louisa’s romantic prospects in this article so tread carefully) which tells us that ITV has committed to making a fourth season of The Durrells and that many key figures are returning to produce, direct and act in the show.

Besides Season One and Season Two on DVD,  we have many, many books written by Gerald and Lawrence in the collection.  Rosy is My Relative is a fabulous pick if you wanted something to read aloud on a car journey – it is sure to please everyone in your family.   You will find endless information about all of the Durrells on the Internet including wonderful content about Gerald’s conservation efforts and his Wildlife Conservation Trust.

It’s possible that after enjoying this miniseries you might be inspired to cook like Louisa, dress like Margo or plan a trip of your own to Greece.  The Durrells will keep you busy all through the summer with the help of the staff here at WPL.  And, if you are inspired to adopt a goat or a turtle then that’s entirely on Gerald.

— Penny M.

Tis the Season…for Wedding Movies!

The warm weather is here along with the flowers and bells of wedding season. Horse drawn carriages, brides in white gowns, vows of love all sealed with a kiss – weddings are fairytales come to life. The Waterloo Public Library has an extensive collection of movies showcasing all the charms and attractions that weddings have to offer, along with all the over-the-top drama that comes with planning them.

The Royal Wedding
Let’s start off with the biggest wedding of the year – Prince Harry’s marriage to Meghan Markle. When there is so much tragedy featured in the media it is refreshing to finally see something happy on the news. This DVD covers the pre-wedding celebrity arrivals, the ceremony and post-wedding farewells from the crowds lining the streets.

The Wedding Plan
An Israeli movie about an Orthodox Jewish woman named Michal on her path to marriage. However, things between Michal and her fiancé crumble one month before the wedding ceremony. Rather than cancel the wedding, she continues her planning with the belief that her faith will guide her to true love in time for the ceremony.

My Big Fat Greek Wedding
This is my personal favourite wedding movie. It originally started out as a one-woman play and went on to become one of the highest-grossing independent films of all time. The star of the film, Nia Vardalos, based the story on her own Greek family life and eventual marriage to a non-Greek man.

The Wedding Singer
Adam Sandler plays a disgruntled wedding singer so bitter that he sets out to ruin other people’s weddings. This is until he meets a bubbly waitress played by Drew Barrymore. As time goes on he realizes there may be hope for true love after all.

Four Weddings and Funeral
Although it was originally released in the 90’s, this movie has stood the test of time. Full of British humour and a brilliant performance by Hugh Grant, the film centres on an awkward young man and his romantic life. He becomes love-struck by a young American woman who he keeps meeting at different weddings and of course, a funeral.

The Hangover
This is a wedding movie for guys. The film begins when the groomsmen get together to give the groom-to-be one last hurrah in Las Vegas. They have a wild night that no one can seem to remember. The next day the groom is nowhere to be found and the wedding is just hours away.

Bridesmaids
Comedies aren’t always recognized for Academy Awards, but Bridesmaids received both an Original Screenplay and a Best Supporting Actress (Melissa McCarthy) nomination. Annie, a down-on- her-luck sales clerk is asked to be the Maid of Honour at her best friend’s wedding where she instantly clashes with the other girls serving as bridesmaids. This original film pushes the boundaries when it comes to vulgar humour and female comediennes.

There are many more wedding movies and romantic comedies in our collection. Curl up with a glass of wine and a few tissues and enjoy some great wedding flicks.

— Lesley L.

Young Jane Young

This book surprised me. And I do so love a surprise. Going into this book I was expecting a funny, fiction read. Enjoyable but light. What I got was a different experience. Sure, it had interesting characters and a touch of humour but it was the author, Gabrielle Zevin’s ability to turn my thoughts on their heads and make me see things in a different light that got my attention.

Young Jane Young has its funny, chuckle to yourself, bits but also addresses big issues like shame, forgiveness, strength and about not running from your past but facing issues head-on so they get out of YOUR way.

“How did you ever survive that scandal?”

She said, “I refused to be shamed.”

“How did you do that?” you asked.

“When they came at me, I kept coming,” she said.” 

But what truly shone for me was the idea that the assumptions we make greatly influence our understanding of what we’ve experienced and our reactions to those events. I admit to catching myself assuming things about characters and the plot and we all know what they say about assuming. I loooved that aspect of the book and it gave me a lot to think about.

The story is told by four women – Aviva, who is at the heart of the scandal, her mother Rachel, Ruby, Aviva’s daughter and Embeth, the senator’s wife. These four women have made mistakes, have complicated relationships with each other but together they tell the many sides of this story. These women have moxie. You can’t deny it. They’re fighters and I loved seeing the strength and diversity in the female cast.

Readers will easily see strong correlations to the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal but Zevin brings her own perspective and shows how one perception of an issue isn’t the only one. Scandal has a domino effect and impacts those around it in varying degrees. I applaud Zevin for confronting the blatant double standards put on women that are still prevalent, sadly tolerated and even encouraged, in our society today.  The topic of this book is quite timely with recent events but ultimately this is a story about the complex relationships between women, it’s got humour, heart, food for thought and a fighter’s spirit. What more could you ask for?

-Laurie P.

This is your holiday read

I just read the best book. It’s called Roost and it’s written by Ali Bryan who is Canadian. It came out in 2013 and is her first novel. I can’t wait for her next which is called “The Figgs” and comes out May 2018.

Bryan’s novel is the first person story of single mother Claudia who lives in Halifax and works full-time. She shops at Canadian Tire and Joe Fresh, often thinking back to happier days when she didn’t buy her clothes in a grocery store. Claudia lives with her two toddlers, Wes and Joan who are hilarious and so well written they dance off the page. This entire book is so funny I laughed out loud during the whole thing and it’s also so, so smart. I had the treat to go to Toronto to visit my Aunt a week ago and started reading it on the early morning train and I was laughing before 7am in the No-Talk zone! Don’t tell!

Claudia is separated from her husband Glen but still relies on him heavily to help out with household maintenance like finally removing the ugly rooster border in her kitchen. She knows she needs to let go, but not yet. Every time he comes over to help or take the children for his weekend, she notices something new about him; a new car or pair of pants. He gets a new dog and a fancy apartment and takes up painting when Claudia barely has time most days for a shower. Even the kids behave better around him. These details take Glen further and further away from Claudia while she feels like she can barely keep her head above water.

Things get worse when her mother dies; no spoiler here, it’s how the book begins. She and her brother Dan and his wife must find time to grieve while caring for their father who is not doing well on his own. It’s just all too much. Dan’s life is perfect and completely opposite from Claudia’s, until he shows what a jerk he is when his wife begins to suffer from postpartum depression and he can’t understand or help her. There are so many poignant parts that are lovely and make your heart do that happy/sad heavy flippy thing (I know you know what I mean).

It is a story everyone can relate to; family squabbles, overtired children during the holidays, running around but never feeling you’re doing well enough. It’s about having a hard time when things have to change and you don’t want them to. It’s about those lovely and chaotic moments with you kids. It is a short book, just under 300 pages and I’d say perfect for reading over the holidays, one night when you can sneak away from the craziness and take a bath. It is a glimpse into the lives of this family. There are no surprises or lessons learned, just about good people doing their best.

-Sarah C.

In the words of women

While this would be a book that I would normally consider a ‘light’ read, I must admit that I enjoyed it very much!

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows centres around Nikki, the daughter of Sikh parents living in London, England. Having abandoned her father’s dream of her becoming a lawyer, she finds herself working in a bar while trying to figure out what she really wants to do in her life. Having embraced the life of a modern woman in her twenties, she regularly comes into conflict with her mother’s view of how and where she should be living. Nikki’s life becomes interesting when she impulsively and successfully applies to teach a ‘creative writing’ class in a local Sikh community centre. However, her students, who are a group of Punjabi widows, believe that they are coming to a class to learn basic English literacy. The intersection of their varying goals for this class gets very interesting.

There is an East Indian cultural narrative that is woven throughout the story which is very revealing and the reader is witness to the struggle that young people face when intertwining cultural tradition with modern ways. Additionally, we get a glimpse into the challenging life of an immigrant and the lengths to which they will go to create a sense of security and familiarity in their new country.

Layered on top of that is the repressed sexuality of the Punjabi widows who have gathered to share, in written form, their dreams, fantasies and amorous experiences. The women, who have had varied degrees of matrimonial experiences in the bedroom, are eager to break free from the cultural chains that left many of them to be merely housemaids, child bearers and receptacles for their husband’s desires. The stories they create are lush with sensuality and imagination and they bring comfort and a sense of unity to the widows. However, the need to keep their activities secret is intense within the confines of a community kept in cultural check by the Brotherhood, a gang of self-appointed militia, whose mission is to keep people true to the doctrines and strictures of the faith. Nikki’s relentless support of her ‘students’ places her in serious danger with the Brotherhood and others who see her as a threat to their cultural cohesion. As one would expect, word about the stories does eventually leak and many people within the community begin to benefit from the tales being spun in the ‘Learn to Write English’ class being held at the temple. A sensuous romp!

-Nancy C.

The smaller things

First off, I loved this book.

I have read a lot of “small books” lately, stories that are less than 200 pages but in no way lacking heart. My favourite at the moment is Goodbye, Vitamin by Rachel Khong. This novel is about Ruth, who after suffering through a major breakup with her fiancé realizes she must finally acknowledge the mess that is her parents’ marriage as well as her father’s dementia. Ruth’s discovers good things as well; that her father kept a diary from when Ruth was little. He rips pages from it and leaves them around the house for Ruth to find and they are lovely and funny. There are so many funny bits in this novel, little discoveries given to us from the author, different ways of seeing simple things.

At one point Ruth wonders why she spends so much time on spending money instead of spending time with her family. Another time she is thinking about a good day she had with her stupid ex-fiancé Joel and wonders if now, since they are no longer together, it still counts as something that matters in her life. She is tired of things that don’t matter or don’t count.

Like I’ve said, the book is small so Khong gives us glimpses into these thoughts, but that’s all we need for them to stick. The novel is beautifully written and it is hard to imagine how the author fit so much into such a small space. It made my heart feel big. And have I mentioned how gorgeous the book’s cover is, because it is gorgeous.

Other wonderful, small books I have loved:

My Name Is Lucy Barton – Elizabeth Strout
On Chesil Beach – Ian McEwan
The Great Gatsby  – F. Scott Fitzgerald
Chicken soup with rice: a book of months – Maurice Sendak

-Sarah C.

The great Jeffrey Tambor

When I’m working here at the library and someone asks me how I am feeling I almost always answer “great” or “fantastic” because really, it is always a fabulous day when you work in a public library. Still, once in a while, I think about my eventual retirement and those thoughts turn to working in a bookstore. Doesn’t that just sound perfect?  So for research purposes I keep tabs on a few bookstores through their newsletters and social media and was so excited to learn that the actor Jeffrey Tambor is part owner of a wonderful shop in Los Angeles. It’s called Skylight and they have the coziest little spot there with a neighbourhood vibe that comes across in their website and through their promotional material.

Another favourite shop of mine is owned by author Louise Erdrich (the most recent book you will find of hers on our shelves is the fifth book in her series for children called Makoons but if you missed her 2016 novel for adults, LaRose, you should go back and enjoy it right now) and it’s a treat of a bookshop in Minneapolis. Actually, it’s not just a store that sells books. Birchbark Books sells “good books, native arts and jewelry” and is also a community hub. It’s another vibrant website that is worth visiting regularly for their great book vibe and cheerful photographs of the dogs that are connected with staff and visitors to the store.

Several other authors have connections to bookstores and this isn’t surprising at all.  Judy Blume has a splendid community hub in Key West that hosts great author readings that you dream about attending in flip flops while carrying a suitable iced drink (www.booksandbookskw.com) and the ever delightful Ann Patchett has a crew of amazing booksellers in Nashville at Parnassus Books where you know you would spend hours making friends with books, booksellers and the furry creatures who visit there. I have a special place in my heart for a store in Plainville, Mass. Wimpy Kid author Jeff Kinney opened his store, called An Unlikely Story, in a town of less than 9,000 by turning an old building into a bookstore, café, gift shop and a large meeting space that is used for yoga classes, community events and some of the best author readings I have ever seen.  It’s almost painful to get their newsletter as you see how many authors make the trip to Jeff Kinney’s store to read – they must all love this guy or just be a part of that wonderful literary feeling they have there. Now that is a reason to take a road trip!

And, speaking of great author visits, Jeffrey Tambor was a guest at his own bookstore when he launched his memoir Are you anybody? in May of this year. That would have been a wonderful, welcoming crowd even though at this point in his career, I think he and his family of young children are living in New York City. Tambor began his career on Broadway but has had small roles in many of the iconic TV shows of the late 70s and early 80s like “Taxi” and “Starsky & Hutch”.  Do you remember him from “The Ropers”?  I absolutely do.  He is still stopped on the street for that part even though most recently he is playing George Sr. & Oscar Bluth in “Arrested Development” and was also the incredible Maura Pfefferman in “Transparent”.  There is no way anyone will forget that part. People will stop him on the street to talk about that show for decades. Just imagine having such an incredible career. Well, you don’t have to imagine this because you can read about it in this outstanding book.

This is a memoir I would have missed if I hadn’t received an e-mail about it from Skylight books and I am so thrilled to have read it. Jeffrey Tambor has been a lifelong presence on the big and small screen (you should have a look at his CV on imdb.com – you have to keep scrolling and scrolling through it) and so many of the parts he has played have stayed with me. His face and his voice stand out in each production he has done and reading his memories and how grateful he is for each opportunity was quite a treat. He’s an actor, not a writer, so the pacing of the book floats around a bit but you get a real sense of his personality far more than you would if he had used a ghost writer or if this were a celebrity memoir which had been ‘told to’ someone else and had all of the fun massaged out of it. I think this might be a book I’ll choose to buy. I just can’t decide which of my favourite bookstores to order it from.

–Penny M.

 

Drop in for a book chat

Please join us for a book club conversation at any of our meetings. No need to sign up – you can just drop in!

How to Bake Pi : An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics by Eugenia Cheng

Monday, June 12 – 7:00pm – Main Library Auditorium

What is math? How exactly does it work? And what do three siblings trying to share a cake have to do with it? In How to Bake Pi , math professor Eugenia Cheng provides an accessible introduction to the logic and beauty of mathematics, powered, unexpectedly, by insights from the kitchen: we learn, for example, how the bechemel in a lasagna can be a lot like the number 5, and why making a good custard proves that math is easy but life is hard.

Combined with her infectious enthusiasm for cooking and a true zest for life, Cheng’s perspective on math becomes this singular book: a funny, lively, and clear journey through a vast territory no popular book on math has explored before. How to Bake Pi offers a whole new way to think about a field all of us think we know; it will both dazzle the constant reader of popular mathematics and amuse and enlighten even the most hardened math-phobe. So, what is math? Let’s look for the answer in the kitchen.

Punishment by Linden MacIntyre

Thursday, June 15 – 1:30pm – Main Library Auditorium

In Punishment , his first novel since completing his Long Stretch trilogy, Scotiabank Giller-winner Linden MacIntyre brings us a powerful exploration of justice and vengeance, and the peril that ensues when passion replaces reason, in a small town shaken by a tragic death. Forced to retire early from his job as a corrections officer in Kingston Penitentiary, Tony Breau has limped back to the village where he grew up to lick his wounds, only to find that Dwayne Strickland, a young con he’d had dealings with in prison is back there too-and once again in trouble. Strickland has just been arrested following the suspicious death of a teenage girl, the granddaughter of Caddy Stewart, Tony’s first love. Tony is soon caught in a fierce emotional struggle between the outcast Strickland and the still alluring Caddy. And then another figure from Tony’s past, the forceful Neil Archie MacDonald-just retired in murky circumstances from the Boston police force-stokes the community’s anger and suspicion and an irresistible demand for punishment. As Tony struggles to resist the vortex of vigilante action, Punishment builds into a total page-turner that blindsides you with twists and betrayals.

You can find more information about WPL Book Clubs here or contact Christine Brown at 519-886-1310 ext. 146.

Hooked on Trevor Noah

When Jon Stewart left The Daily Show I was bereft. I did so love his witty, honest commentary and I had never heard of this ‘Trevor Noah’ guy who would replace him. But I needn’t have worried. Noah quickly became one of my favourite ‘tell-it-like-it-is’ comedic commentators on current events and I wanted to know more about him.


In his book, through a series of vignettes, Noah shows his readers what life was like for him as a bi-racial child, who never felt like he really fit in, during post-Apartheid South Africa. He shares funny, loving, awkward and negative aspects of his childhood and many of his descriptions of the harsh realities of living in South Africa at that time will hit you like a punch in the gut. He was a self-proclaimed troublemaker as a child and teenager and some of his antics made me want to yell “What were you thinking?!?” He definitely liked to stir things up.

 

“The names of the kids with detention were announced at every assembly, and I was always one of them. Always. Every single day. It was a running joke. The prefect would say, ‘Detentions for today…’ 

and I would stand up automatically. It was like the Oscars and I was Meryl Streep.” 


I respect his brutal honesty and I love, love, LOVED the special, yet often complicated, bond he had with his mother — the ultra-religious, determined, fierce, rebellious woman who wanted so much more for her son. Though a few of her parenting methods may surprise some, her deep love for her son is indisputable.

 

She’d say things to me like, “It’s you and me against the world.” I understood even from an early age that we weren’t just mother and son. We were a team.”

 

Growing up I learned about Apartheid in school but I know I only got the bare gist of it. In stark contrast, Noah brings a human side to the economic and social aspects of segregation, hatred and the blatant violation of human rights and basic decency that one group committed against so many others.

 

“Language brings with it an identity and a culture, or at least the perception of it. A shared 

language says ‘We’re the same.’ A language barrier says ‘We’re different.’ The architects of 

apartheid understood this. Part of the effort to divide black people was to make sure 

we were separated not just physically but by language as well…The great thing about 

language is that you can just as easily use it to do the opposite: convince people 

that they are the same. Racism teaches us that we are different because of the color of our skin. 

But because racism is stupid, it’s easily tricked.”  

 

“People love to say, “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.” What they don’t say is, “And it would be nice if you gave him a fishing rod.” That’s the part of the analogy that’s missing.”

 

Before reading this book, I was already a fan of Trevor Noah. I enjoyed his honest yet humorous approach to current events. He’s obviously a well-informed and funny guy but, after reading this book, I have a better understanding of where he comes from. Trevor Noah will make you laugh, cry and give you much to think about. The hype surrounding this book is duly given. I highly recommend this book. 

 

–Laurie P.